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Thread: Quilting on a sewing machine

  1. #1
    Senior Member wytetygeress's Avatar
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    Ok so by know everyone knows i am a newbie when it comes to quilting. Well i have my top and backing done, in the process of pinning the sandwich together for the quilting.. I am going to be FMQ on my sewing machine and was wondering if Yall had any advise for this newbie..and a question: Where do i actually start the quilting?

  2. #2
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    Practice, practice, practice! Make some practice squares to get the feel for FMQ, unless you very comfortable with it already.

  3. #3
    Senior Member wytetygeress's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa_wanna_b_quilter
    Practice, practice, practice! Make some practice squares to get the feel for FMQ, unless you very comfortable with it already.
    Nope never done it...this will be my first attempt...maybe i should practice on something that i didn't spend forever piecing together...ROFL

  4. #4
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    Will be watching this topic myself, I think most will say start in the middle and work out, I have a couple of quilts I want to get finished and delivered and while my friend is very generous with allowing me to use her longarm, this is the tax season and she works for H&R Block so we can't co-ordinate our schedules very easily.

  5. #5
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
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    you need to put together a number of little (sandwiches) and start practicing ,... alot...before trying to work on your finished quilt! it takes alot of practice to free-motion quilt...best to start with maybe pot-holder size sandwiches, then placemats, then table runner, ect...and work your way up to the size of your quilt so you learn to manuver the sandwich through the machine. EVERYONE HAS TO PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE.

  6. #6
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    OK, if you've never done it, you should practice. You will probably have to adjust you tension. I'm not good with it, but I do better with a moderate speed and slower moving hands. Your hands control the stitch length so you have to practice to see what speed you need to get a stitch you like.

  7. #7
    Super Member Quilter7x's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl
    you need to put together a number of little (sandwiches) and start practicing ,... alot...before trying to work on your finished quilt! it takes alot of practice to free-motion quilt...best to start with maybe pot-holder size sandwiches, then placemats, then table runner, ect...and work your way up to the size of your quilt so you learn to manuver the sandwich through the machine. EVERYONE HAS TO PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE.
    I agree with sandwiches, you can even write notes on them for tension settings, type of thread and needle for future reference. You should start in the middle and work your way out. You can either roll or accordion fold the side of the quilt that goes in the harp area of the machine.

    A sandwich is just two pieces of fabric with a piece of batting in between. 12-16" square is a good starting size - but the size doesn't have to be perfect, just something you can use now and refer to later.

    You are very smart to ask questions! :thumbup:

  8. #8
    Beginner64's Avatar
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    If this is your first attempt at FMQ and especially if you don't have a stitch regulator on your sewing machine, it would behove you to practice practice practice on scrap material until you are really comfortable with the process. I would really hate to see you ruin all of your work so far or have to spend numerous hours taking out stitches. Just a word or advice, that's what I would do.

  9. #9
    Senior Member wytetygeress's Avatar
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    Thank you all for such great advise. I will be taking it. I really don't want to mess this top up. And as much as i hate leaving something unfinished i will put it away until i have the experience needed to finish it. Hopefully it won't be to long. Another question Do i need to put the quilt sandwiches in any kind of hoop or frame to FMQ?

  10. #10
    Super Member Quilter7x's Avatar
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    No hoop if you're doing FMQ because you won't be putting your quilt in the machine that way.

    I'm at work now and can't see videos here, but here is a link that might help you also. I did a search on free motion quilting on this board and came up with this: http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-63710-1.htm

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