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Thread: Rag Quilt????

  1. #21

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    I also have used very thin batting with my rag quilts. Also, a flannel flat sheet, cutting if needed. I have made rag wall hangings with just 100% cotton fabric. For smaller wall hangings, I have used flannel baby blankets for the batting. I usually buy them at thrift shop. They have been washed and used, therefore not much $$ involved.

  2. #22
    Susie's Avatar
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    Thank you for replying.
    When I sew the seems together and you have the 4 seems there together which makes a square joined, mine are always too thick. I understand what you mean. I clip after everything is sewn. A friend of mine made fun of me because she said I always make the rag quilts. I had to start somewhere. One friend said rag quilts are too hard. I find them fun and you can get one done in a day. They are very cozy. I never thought of getting the blankets from the thrift stores for batting. I have seen some at the Goodwill. Great idea. I have never seen anyone make a rag quilt and so I have nothing to go by in person. I worry too much when sewing. They say that makes a quilt have charater.
    Thanks

  3. #23

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    What would you estimate your thickness to be? Is that with or without batting? The sq's are thick. I use 1/4" batting, so when my sq's are sandwiched, I estimate it just a tad over a 1/4". Your right about a rag quilt being warm,cozy, and snuggiliy,

  4. #24
    community benefactor Knot Sew's Avatar
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    http://www.quiltknit.com/patterns/rag_quilts.htm


    these will give you some ideas, I don't think you need to buy a pattern. you can use whatever you have or like :P

  5. #25
    Susie's Avatar
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    This is a great site. Thanks
    Your right, I can look at the pictures and figure out a pattern.

  6. #26
    Susie's Avatar
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    Maybe that is the problem, the thickness. I use flannel and the warm and natural batting that is probably 1/4 thick.

  7. #27

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    I tried the warm and natural and I did'nt find it to be to needle friendly. I also found out that the warm and natural is'nt machine washable. Maybe they have since came out with one that is. If so please give me the brand name, I would really appreciate it. To really create the rag effect you need to be able to wash your quilt.

  8. #28
    community benefactor Knot Sew's Avatar
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    how about old clothes, or old towels. makes more raggy edges and can be as heavy as you like. You will need to adjust the pressure and use a heavy duty needle

  9. #29

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    Sounds like that would work. Ecxcept for the towels, when they are cut, they always leave a trail behind, dot's of tiny pieces of thread.

  10. #30
    Boo
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    Ok, I feel the need to interject my two cents. When making a rag quilt, or rag type apparel, the batting is cut an inch smaller. This allows for the 1/2" seam allowance. If you are using a 1" seam allowance, then cut the batting 2" smaller.
    Let me give you an example. If my fabric, let's say flannel, is cut 8" square, I then cut my batting 7" for 1/2" seam or 6" for 1" seam. Lay out a square of fabric, center the batting, top with second piece of fabric. Now sew from corner to corner making an X thru the center of the block. When all your blocks are sewn in this manner, then you sew them into rows. Your seam allowance does not contain any batting. I clip those seams about 1/4" apart, making sure to stop short of the actual seam stitching. Trust me, you don't want your quilt to come apart. As you will be cutting thru 4 layers of fabric, regular sewing shears don't work well. I have some spring loaded clippers from Fiscars. Much less work and less tiring on the hands.
    Final tips on rag quilts. Warm and Natural batting works well and washes fine if you follow the above method of sewing the X. The size of the block will be determined in the above example by the size of the batting. In my example, I cut 6" of batting for 1" seam and 8" fabric. Therefore, block will be 6" finished. After washing quilt, place in dryer and clean lint trap every 10-15 minutes. I have often resorted to taking to laundrymat and using their dryers. Some rag quilts like to be wet down and dried a second time. Hope you find this information helpful.

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