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Thread: Refurbished Voyager Longarm machine ???

  1. #11
    Senior Member sylviak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    southern Oklahoma
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    954
    I bought my Voyager and Hinterberg Stretch frame five or 6 years ago and have really enjoyed using it. There should be a lot of them on the market since Nolting isn't going to make any more of them, but it would be a great starter machine. It is heavy...about 70 lbs...but it is easy to use. I bought mine with a stitch regulator, but it's not a necessity. The quilt in my avatar was done with the Voyager. My DH (who is NOT handy!) and I put the frame together in an evening. You might also want to check out the Tin Lizzie, which is not as expensive as some of the other machines and it's owners seem to really like it.

  2. #12
    Super Member slk350's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Ft. Myers, FL
    Posts
    1,833
    Thanks kimv44 for the recent info. I did see more long arm set ups at the Sewing Expo a couple of weeks ago. The frames ARE really big. I wouldn't do anything bigger than a queen quilt. I'm still going to check out other long arms when I can. Not so sure I really want to put it in my dining room, but no basements down here in FL.

  3. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by slk350 View Post
    Thanks kimv44 for the recent info. I did see more long arm set ups at the Sewing Expo a couple of weeks ago. The frames ARE really big. I wouldn't do anything bigger than a queen quilt. I'm still going to check out other long arms when I can. Not so sure I really want to put it in my dining room, but no basements down here in FL.
    I love my Voyager and Hinterberg stretch frame. In addition to how dependable my Voyager has been the length of the frame is adjustable for the space you have. You determine the length of the frame by the length of the steel bars you purchase. These can be cut to a size that works for you but do this BEFORE you put the ends on. It is next to impossible to get the ends out of the steel bars once in. Ask me how I know this...Well anyway you can purchase new ends from the company if you ever want to change to a larger or smaller size. I have two sets of bars for different situations now. You do have to take the machine off before you can change the bars out to change the size of the frame. The Voyager head is heavy. I think the carton and packaging with the machine in it weighed 70 pounds so the machine head weighs near that amount. I cannot imagine that any of the other machines are any less heavy though. I love that the Voyager is one of the quietest long arm machines I tested before I purchased and it works like a dream. Yes, there is a learning curve but that would be true for any long arm set up that is new to you. Be sure you want to commit to the space these machines take up before you purchase. I find (and my friend who has different machine, a new HQ) that you need a space the length of the machine plus at least 2 feet so you can get around one end of the machine. Front to back space you need is 5 feet minimum so you can access the back of the frame. You won't need to do this often but if you are one of the people who prefer working from behind and for some applications you will need to set your frame up to allow extra space for that. To save floor space in the room where I use the long arm I have purchased some drawers that fit under the machine. I store all my manuals, threads, accessories, markers, etc., for the long arm in these drawers.
    Good luck and happy quilting

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