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Thread: To repair or not a heirloom quilt

  1. #1
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    To repair or not a heirloom quilt

    I need some advice on a worn quilt from the late 1800's. Will repairing or patching affect the value of a quilt like this? Thank you for any opinions.

  2. #2
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    I need to follow this, as I've been contacted by a relative with the same questions.

  3. #3
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    It always affect the value and it always affect the value down.

  4. #4
    Senior Member momymom's Avatar
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    It's more a question of restoration vs conservation. Do you want to restore it to the original , or conserve what's left of the quilt. You might want to research the subject. There are specialests that restore and conserve quilts and textiles. A conversation with one might be helpfull to you. You may also concider have the quilt appraised.
    TN girl just trying to get home.

  5. #5
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    If it is an antique, it does devalue it if you do anything to it. You would need to get an expert opionion in that case. If you don't intend to ever want to sell it and just want it for display then there are lots of ways to repair it. From hand sewing bridal tulle over the frayed spot and missing areas,to hand sewing in vintage fabrics that you hunt for to match the fabric in the quilt. You might be able to ask at your local Historical Society? Does your public Library have a research section? You might be able to find a quilt appraiser to give you an idea for a charge of course.

  6. #6
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    I don't believe that restoration always devalues a quilt. As long as the restoration is properly done (and with either similar vintage or reproduction fabrics from the same time frame), I am sure it would increase the value of a worn quilt, because with quilts, the value is all about "condition, condition, condition". (Like in real estate it's "location, location, location".)

  7. #7
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
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    first step is to take the quilt to a quilt historian and find out what kind of value it has- and what they recommend- some quilts are better off being repaired-others should be left alone-
    and just because a quilt is old it may not be considered a valuable quilt-except to you- age does not automatically make value. some things are valuable to us because of a personal connection- but have no real market value-
    once you find out just where the value lies with your (heirloom) you can determine if restoration is in order.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  8. #8
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    I agree...the first thing to do is find out what it's worth. The next thing to decide is how you want to use (or not) it. Then make your decision based on these and all the other things the other Board members have brought up. Good luck!
    If you feel like you're special...it's 'cause you are!
    Momto5

  9. #9
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    You have excellent advice here.
    As you look for an appraiser, see that they are an AQS certified quilt appraiser, can find that here:
    http://www.americanquilter.com/quilt...appraisers.php

    Jan in VA
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    peacefully colors my world.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl View Post
    first step is to take the quilt to a quilt historian and find out what kind of value it has- and what they recommend- some quilts are better off being repaired-others should be left alone-
    and just because a quilt is old it may not be considered a valuable quilt-except to you- age does not automatically make value. some things are valuable to us because of a personal connection- but have no real market value-
    once you find out just where the value lies with your (heirloom) you can determine if restoration is in order.
    I agree; get advice from the professionals on the value and how you should (if you should) restore/preserve it.
    Judy

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