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Thread: Request to teach - suggestions please

  1. #11
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    first off you have to decide if you are going to be a business and find out the issues involved in that...and yes, even if you teach in a shop/school/business, and you take money are considered a "contracted" business!

    if you teach in your home, contact your insurance agent and find out what the issues for liability will be.

    you of course then also have to contact your city to find out the legalities of running a business in your home...

    it gets really disheartening..trust me...
    I found teaching at the local college in the continueing ed classes was best and easiest as they did all the advertising,etc...but you are still considered a contracted business and must file all necessary taxes!

    a TRUE beginner quilting class should never take less than 6 weekly classes..I prefer 8, but that is a two month commitment..hard for most to do! and NO weekly class should ever last more than 2 hours...the beginner brain can't take it all in so more time is just more confusion/frustration usually!

    Pm me, I have been teaching all of the above for years...

  2. #12
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    The National Quilting Assn has a book "Teaching Basic Quiltmaking" You might check that out.
    The personal problem I have with many beginning/basic quilting classes is that the teacher trys to teach everything about quilting, including machine quilting, freemotion etc etc etc etc. And, I don't believe it is about what the student wants but what a beginning student needs to know to be successful and less frustrating.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Just-Lee's Avatar
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    Great ideas from everyone! Maybe you could do a beginner class, where you teach the basic rotary cutting, 1/4" seams, etc. and just make a pot holder and maybe an oven mitt. If they do well and are still interested, do an intermediate class where they could make a table runner/ topper, and then an adv. class...teaching more quilting techniques as you advance. I gave up on classes at dealers because they seem to never be able to come back down to my level and always make me feel more stupid than I know I am!! The basics are everything in the beginning and since I have never learned any of them really, I just do rag quilts...hard for even me to screw that up!

    I wish I knew someone in my area to take a small/ private class with!

  4. #14
    Senior Member Qwiltylady's Avatar
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    i taught at juvenile detention for a couple of years and our basic classes started with how to thread a needle and tie a knot in the end! Find out how basic the skills of the class are and then go from there. I had 2 feather weights that I took with me each week and they all wanted to sew on the machines but I made sure they knew how to stitch by hand first. I have received notes from several of the kids thanking me for the skills I taught them because they found that it helped them to know how to do basic repairs etc.

  5. #15
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    Thank you for all the suggestions so far. They have been very helpful.

    I want the first beginner class to be just that - very beginner. For those that want to learn quilting but don't have a clue what it is all about. To learn the basics, the equipment and cut and sew something real easy just to get the feel for what it is all about, the equipment they will need to have. But to also actually make something simple, but to have made something.

    I like the idea of precut pieces for them to sew for the first class. I know to go to a sewing/quilting class and come home having made something already makes you feel better than to go to a class and come away with just a bunch of notes and hand outs.

  6. #16
    Super Member Pam H's Avatar
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    I took a beginning quilting class 2 years ago. We learned how to use a rotary cutter/ruler/mat. She showed us how to cut the pieces for a friendship star. We learned how to put the first block together during the first class. For homework we had to have the rest of our blocks made before the next class where we learned about sashing and putting our quilts together. For our next class all the blocks had to be sewn together because we were learning how to do a mitered border. The last class was about quilting and binding. The 4 weeks of 2 hour classes were very worthwhile. The handouts she gave were/are very helpful.
    My LQS owner teaches beginning quilting classes where she teaches a Take 5. From choosing the fabrics to a finished quilt. That seems like a great way to go too.

  7. #17
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    Teach them about the machine first - all the bits and maintenance and how to thread etc. You will be surprised about what they don't know, so it is better not to assume that they have prior knowledge.

  8. #18
    Junior Member keesha_ont's Avatar
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    I have taught beginners classes - we do a sampler quilt with different squares/techniques. The participants love it and some of their quilts have grown into bedsize quilts.

  9. #19
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    Hi, The class I teach is a nine patch with solid block inbetween. My class last for 4 weeks. The first class is cutting, learning to use their machines, and achieving a 1/4 inch when sewing. Most finish cutting the first class. Some want homework so they can start sewing the strips together making sure they are getting an accurate seam allowance. Almost all finish the project in the 4 weeks except for the quilting and some start the stitch in the ditch before they leave. They can come back when they have finished their quilting and I help them attach the binding. I was amazed how many didn't know about their machines so tell them to bring their manuals. Happy teaching, Memepat

  10. #20
    Senior Member star619's Avatar
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    After learning the hard way, I prepared a sheet giving the scope of the class, the time allotted, the items students were expected to bring,and a disclaimer that at least 3 people needed to sign up, or the class would be re-scheduled.
    When they signed up, they paid for the class in full & there were no refunds for no shows (exceptions at the discretion of the teacher - death in family, etc.). Keep your"kits"for them with you -don't send them home! When class begins,expect socializing for 15 minutes, but then get to work. Have a hand-out prepared taking them through the steps (so they don't have to take notes) -which will also allow them to complete the project at home if they do not finish. Of course, these are just suggestions for you, but each one was created by MY learning curve & many "I'll never do it that way agains!". A happy experience for the students AND teacher will prevent complaints (students) & burnout (teacher). God bless! Debbie

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