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Thread: restoring an old quilt

  1. #1
    Super Member girliegirl's Avatar
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    This is my grandmother's quilt my mom was going to throw out.. It needs help, well it is yellowed, but it is falling or rotting apart, What do you think? If i cut 4 inches all around and rebind it, it will no longer fit the bed, or I could reborder it, but then It would cover the original quilting. I have to replace some of the appliquie flowers? on it, I don't know the patten but would love to make one like it.. there are slits in it that I am just going to sew closed.. don't know what else to do with it... I need old vintage material I guess..
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  2. #2
    Super Member Vicki W's Avatar
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    The quilting is lovely. I don't know if it is practical (all things are possible) could you add an additonal border and preserve the quilting?

  3. #3
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
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    I think the pattern is Orange Peel. Do what you can to save it, doesn't have to be perfect. Don't subject it to too much strain and over use.

    I would wash by hand, soak in all-fabric (non-chlorine) bleach for a couple of days to help with the yellowing.

  4. #4
    Super Member Fabaddict's Avatar
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    I took one to an appraiser, and was told not to fix it or replace any of the damaged pieces.

  5. #5
    Super Member running1's Avatar
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    Could you re-use it? My mom hired someone once to make my sisters and me an old-time Santa... his "coat" was an old quilt, old tears and raggedy edges and all... He's very cute!

    I'm not very imaginative, but there are plenty of creative folks here on the QB!!

  6. #6
    Super Member Gramyx7's Avatar
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    Hey girlie.. I have a lot of REAL 1930's FEED SACKS, send me pics i might be able to match the fabric and you can sew the piece over the pedal... that's what I did. and that is the same thing with the white muslin, or they used flour sack. you can cut fabric and put a hm on it or turn in under and sew over the rips.. and at the same time put the quilting pattern on the fabric so you have it.. time consuming yes but in the end it is worth it. All by hand.. no machine work. :)

  7. #7
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    Cover the whole quilt, front and back with a thin fabric found in the wedding dress department, I think the name of it is voile and show it off. Even if you don't use it the quilt could be a show piece in a spare bedroom.
    I used voile on an appliqued quilt after I had it done, then quilted the complete quilt. We called them shadow quilts back then. You could just run a line of hand stitching, don't have to be the finest stitches you ever made, between the organge peel motifs to hold the thin fabric in place. It would be a shame to dispose of it, the fabric will not be strong enough to make toys or pillows but it is a treasure. Be sure to make a label as to who made it and used it and when.


    Carol J.

  8. #8
    Senior Member scrappy2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carol J.
    Cover the whole quilt, front and back with a thin fabric found in the wedding dress department, I think the name of it is voile and show it off. Even if you don't use it the quilt could be a show piece in a spare bedroom.
    I used voile on an appliqued quilt after I had it done, then quilted the complete quilt. We called them shadow quilts back then. You could just run a line of hand stitching, don't have to be the finest stitches you ever made, between the organge peel motifs to hold the thin fabric in place. It would be a shame to dispose of it, the fabric will not be strong enough to make toys or pillows but it is a treasure. Be sure to make a label as to who made it and used it and when.


    Carol J.
    Never heard of doing this but my wheels are turning. I too have some old family quilts that needs saving.

  9. #9
    Super Member valleyquiltermo's Avatar
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    Ideals glore, good ones at that. I guess I'm a purest. I would wrap in acid free paper and store in an acid free box,
    Then take it out on hoildays to admire and love.

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