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Thread: Ripping the quilting?

  1. #1
    Member xxmbbxx's Avatar
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    Ripping the quilting?

    Ok, so say you are someone who totally should not have FMQ on something without testing tension etc and now you need to rip it out. How? Lol, help!
    Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is the key to unlocking our potential. - Winston Churchill

  2. #2
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    If the thread is all loopy on the back, it is really easy to find the bobbin thread and pull it out in sections first. Once you've pulled out the straight bobbin thread the top loopy thread comes out fairly well. If you just don't like the design and the thread isn't loose, it will be harder to remove. In that case some people like to separate the layers and clip the threads as they pull the top away from the sandwich. Good luck and hopefully it is a small area?

  3. #3
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    I agree with what tartan said. Though if the tension is OK but my quilting isn't, I tend to snip about every five stitches, then pull the thread on the other side to "pop" the stitches out. Painstaking but usually worth it.

  4. #4
    Member xxmbbxx's Avatar
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    Its on a doll quilt and yeah the tension is ok in some spots and wicked loose in others. Ill try anything at this point.
    Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is the key to unlocking our potential. - Winston Churchill

  5. #5
    Super Member PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    Another way to do it is 'skinning'. Lift the backing up from the sandwich and carefully clip the thread between the backing and batting. There should be a tiny bit of give in the batting so you can get your thread snips in there. If you work from the backing side and slip, you may cut the backing (which you can easily patch) but won't damage your top. Just take your time. It's a great task to do while watching TV.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  6. #6
    Super Member jljack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaperPrincess View Post
    Another way to do it is 'skinning'. Lift the backing up from the sandwich and carefully clip the thread between the backing and batting. There should be a tiny bit of give in the batting so you can get your thread snips in there. If you work from the backing side and slip, you may cut the backing (which you can easily patch) but won't damage your top. Just take your time. It's a great task to do while watching TV.

    I like this suggestion!! At least it's not on a long arm frame....I can't tell you how many hours I have sat under my frame picking out loops of thread because I forgot to lower my presser foot!! LOL

  7. #7
    Super Member Annie68's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaperPrincess View Post
    Another way to do it is 'skinning'. Lift the backing up from the sandwich and carefully clip the thread between the backing and batting. There should be a tiny bit of give in the batting so you can get your thread snips in there. If you work from the backing side and slip, you may cut the backing (which you can easily patch) but won't damage your top. Just take your time. It's a great task to do while watching TV.
    Yup, that's the way I do it!

  8. #8
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    Also try The BOBBIN CAM it is a camera system that watches the back for you so you can see when you mess up and can fix it fast
    bobbincam.com

  9. #9
    Member xxmbbxx's Avatar
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    Ok, so I ripped it all out using the skinning method. Came out good, got it wet and now its flat so all the holes are gone too. Thanks guys!
    Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is the key to unlocking our potential. - Winston Churchill

  10. #10
    Super Member PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jljack View Post
    I like this suggestion!! At least it's not on a long arm frame....I can't tell you how many hours I have sat under my frame picking out loops of thread because I forgot to lower my presser foot!! LOL
    What I do when this occurs is roll the quilt onto the take up until the loops are on the top. Clip them off, then roll it back and the top thread will just lift off. Gee, I sure know a lot about ripping out quilting! Wonder why ;-)
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

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