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Thread: Ruffles go what direction?

  1. #1
    Super Member glenda5253's Avatar
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    Hello fellow members! I am rather new to the board and this is my first 'new topic' I've started so bear with me please.

    This is not exactly about quilting but I know some of you are experienced in garment making, crafts, etc. I am making my DGD curtains, bedskirt and decorative pillows to match a quilt and pillow sham my DD bought at Target. She is getting a "big girl's room for her 3rd BD.

    My DD has her heart set on the same pattern for the curtains that Target has to match the set (even thought I tried to talk her out of all these ruffles). Of course I have made curtains and ruffles before but never these long ruffles that will go down the length of the curtain, have a shirt-tail hem on both sides and be gathered and sewn down the middle of the ruffle.

    I researched on line and found that 'regular ruffles' (that are gathered at the top end should be cut crosswise or on the bias, but because these will run the length of the curtain and be sewn down the middle, I can't help but think they should be cut lengthwise. That is where I need your expert opinion on this matter.

    I hope this link works so you can see what I have tried to explain. I know I am a visual person and suspect my explanation has most of you very confused.

    Thank you so much for your time!

    http://www.target.com/Circo-Ruffle-W...k&frombrowse=1

  2. #2
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    I think the reason they should be cut crosswise or on the bias is so that the fabric will have some stretch when it is ruffled. I'm not an expert, but I think that kind of cut makes nicer-looking ruffles. Lengthwise-cut fabric has no stretch, so I'm betting it makes stiffer looking ruffles that don't look as soft.

  3. #3
    Super Member justwannaquilt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    I think the reason they should be cut crosswise or on the bias is so that the fabric will have some stretch when it is ruffled. I'm not an expert, but I think that kind of cut makes nicer-looking ruffles. Lengthwise-cut fabric has no stretch, so I'm betting it makes stiffer looking ruffles that don't look as soft.
    Agreed!

    Here is my two cents on making this type of curtain!

    If I were making that much ruffle. I would NOT be doing a hem on either side. I would simply do an overlock stitch on either side which will keep them from fraying. Then instead of gathering all that ruffle I would use an elastic thread in my bobbin. sew down the center to "gather" then once you are done with that, then sew them on the curtain!

  4. #4
    Super Member clem55's Avatar
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    I"ve had pretty good luck using the elastic thread in the bottom, but if you do gathers by hand, use a long piece of cord and zig zag over it, careful not to catch cord. I use crochet thread, makes it easier to pull and it won't break halfway through. Only ruffles I'Ve done were cut on cross grain.

  5. #5
    Super Member glenda5253's Avatar
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    Thanks so much for these speedy replies!

    Ok...a couple of questions. justwannaquilt - you spoke of an overlock stitch. Is that just on a serger (I don't have one) or can my Janome MC3000 do this? I've never learned much about the machine other than simple sewing.

    Also you and clem55 mentioned elastic thread on the bobbin. I'm not familiar with that...does it gather as you sew the stitch and should that be two basting stitches side by side like I would use if I were pulling threads?

  6. #6
    Suz
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    Bias cut ruffles are easier to handle. The edge does not curl under which often happens w/straight cut and then you have to loosen the stitches and uncurl. Also, the bias edge does not shred which happens w/straight. And if you compare the two - bias v. straight - the bias are much prettier.

    When applying to the curtain: measure the entire length of edge of curtain, divide in half and then quarters making w/pins; do the same with the ruffle (divide in half, then quarters); starting at the half point pin, adjust and pin within the space/ruffle allowed; then move to the next quarter for even distribution of the ruffles.

    When making the ruffles, I use the quilting thread and a zigzag as suggested above.

    Hope this helps.
    Suz

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