Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 6 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 56

Thread: Sandwich trouble

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    206
    Blog Entries
    1

    Question Sandwich trouble

    I have read on here about taping the backing down to the floor, then putting on the batting and the quilt top. All were smoothed out and ready to be pinned. How in the dickens do you get your hand underneath to pin the three layers and still have it be smooth? I taped, layered, and tried to get my pins in but the tape came undone and then it wasn't smooth anymore. Have wood floors so don't want to scratch the floor and definitely don't want to spray baste.
    What is the trick? I finally resorted to back to the carpet and on my hands and needs. Might as well pray while I was down there. LOL!!

  2. #2
    Senior Member annesthreads's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    South Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    936
    I slide a cutting mat underneath, then put the pins in from above without hands underneath. But what do I know -still putting off re-doing the quilt that got creases in the back when I sandwiched it recently!
    I visited the local painter and decorator shop to ask about the blue painter's tape that was recommended to me here. I think he was a bit surprised to be helping someone with their sewing, but confirmed that this tape is available in the UK. He didn't have it in stock though - but found me some that was designed to go on wallpaper and delicate surfaces, so I'm hoping that will do the trick.

  3. #3
    Super Member sewmom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Midland, Michigan
    Posts
    1,900
    There is a trick where you put a large marble underneath the backing which holds up the backing from the floor. You then roll the marble to the next area and pin. I have a tile floor, so this hasn't been an issue. I've also pinned them on a table using clamps. I am now trying Sharon Schambert's way of hand basting. Haven't decided if I REALLY like it or not, but at least I'm not on my knees on a tile floor.
    A time to tear, And a time to sew;
    A time to keep silence, And a time to speak;

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Lived in San Diego now retired in Eagar, AZ.
    Posts
    854
    Blog Entries
    1
    this helps explain the popularity of all type of frames (hand and machine) that let you mount the backing first, layer the batting in and put the quilt face on top.... no basting... even for hand quilting, John Flynn's frames were sold for this long before he put them under a machine...

    don't overlook the local machine quilters...most of us will baste a quilt for a one hour charge and it is flat, no tucks no back aches....

    but I have to say, the marble thing is ingenious!

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Sun City, AZ
    Posts
    364
    I have problems with sandwiching too. I have used the blue painters tape which works so-so. Some of my friends use spray, but they have tile floors and I have carpet. No sure if spray would work for me.

    Sandwiching is my least favorite part of making a quilt.

  6. #6
    Senior Member rj.neihart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    507
    When I place my 3 layers onto the carpet, I baste with long stitches. Then I place safety pins on that area. I start in the middle and work my way toward the edging. The basting stitches hold the pieces together so I can smooth out the backing while I'm hand quilting.

  7. #7
    Senior Member SherryW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    884
    It takes time and I use fusible batting and iron it on the top side while it's still on the floor. Then I pick it up carefully and bring to ironing board and iron the other side with the safety pins in place. Works for me. I also have hardwood floors and I haven't scratched them. The batting comes loose from the fabric very easily; it's not a permanent bond.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    9

    Use kitchen island

    I use my kitchen island. It's 4' x 6' now, but my old one was 48" x 30".
    If you don't have an island, one of those hobby/cutting tables with the fold up sides will work well.
    Although I haven't basted a king size on it yet, basting on the island has been working for me.
    I think it's important the surface be flat and that the back be free of wrinkles before you lay it down.
    Smooth each layer out from the center as you lay them on top of each other.
    You can never have enough safety pins.
    Make sure the back is at least 4" larger on all sides to allow for migration when you are smoothing out the layers from the center.
    Start pinning from the center of your section (the section is the part on top of the island at the moment)
    I keep smoothing as I'm pinning - I can usually feel any wrinkles as I go.
    When I'm done with the section, I gently move the quilt sandwich over the island to do a new section.

    There are a few good books that have instructions & tips for basting:

    Harriet Hargrave - Heirloom machine quilting, published by C & T Publishing

    Barbara Schaffeld & Bev Vickery - Hand Quilt Without a Frame, published by Lone Tree Press

    The Complete Book of Machine Quilting, second edition by Robbie & Tony Fanning published by Chilton Book Company
    Charlene

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    16
    If I am basting large quilts I take them to church and use the large tables in Fellowship Hall. If the quilt is larger than one table, just push two together. Works for me!

  10. #10
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    western NY formerly MN, FL, NC, SC
    Posts
    34,147
    Blog Entries
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by sewmom View Post
    There is a trick where you put a large marble underneath the backing which holds up the backing from the floor. You then roll the marble to the next area and pin. I have a tile floor, so this hasn't been an issue. I've also pinned them on a table using clamps. I am now trying Sharon Schambert's way of hand basting. Haven't decided if I REALLY like it or not, but at least I'm not on my knees on a tile floor.
    I love this tip! thanks
    Nancy in western NY
    before you speak THINK
    T is it True? H is it Helpful? I is it Inspiring? N is it Necessary? K is it Kind?



Page 1 of 6 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.