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Thread: Selling quilts?

  1. #1
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    Selling quilts?

    Hi everyone. This is CraftyPerson here. Ok so I have been familiarizing myself with block quilts and easy patterns like that. And realisticly speaking, looking at these tutorials, it looks as if I will have to pay about $50-$75 per sitting just for fabric and batting. I have heard of people selling quilts and I was wondering if that is even a possibility of block quilts. I don't expect to be able to be really good at quilting right away but I was thinking maybe after I get good. I just think it will be hard to keep up quilting if it costs what it does and I only make $20 a month. So I suppose when it boils down to it my two questions are:
    -Can block quilts be expected to sell?
    -If so, how much can I ask for them that is not too expensive but I will make good profit?
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 01-16-2013 at 04:58 AM. Reason: pm to member

  2. #2
    Super Member NikkiLu's Avatar
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    A friend of mine used to own a fabric/quilt shop and she had to give up the store. She brought home lots of fabric and made a bunch of quilts to sell and all she was able to get was the cost of her fabric - none for her labor. By the time she pieced the blocks and quilted the quilt - the cost was so much that nobody could afford them.
    Nikki in MO

  3. #3
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    Yes all quilts can be sold. I would suggest that you charge what you put into it for all supplies and then some for your time work! That way you will have enough money to make your next quilt and so on.

  4. #4
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    Thanks. I would most likely only add $10-$15 for my labor. It just seemed like upwards of $90 was a lot for such a simple beginner quilt pattern, but I guess since they are handmade....... I suppose it is because I am used to seeing lots of listings for crochet and knit things so high price tags can be a little scary. And I suppose I am at somewhat of a disadvantage becuase of my age. Quilts done by a 13 year old probably aren't so appealing.

  5. #5
    Super Member ontheriver's Avatar
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    I sell many of my quilts mostly around the holidays but this year I noticed people are buying more smaller things like table runners, pot holders, things like that. I think some of it is the economy. Good luck.
    Jeanann

    PROQUILTINATING : Working on quilting when you should be cleaning, doing laundry, or cooking.

  6. #6
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    I think selling smaller things like table runners will do better. Don't get discouraged and Don't sell yourself short and good luck
    Create something beautiful from scraps.

  7. #7
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CraftyPerson View Post
    Hi everyone. This is CraftyPerson here. Quick update: I am pretty sure I am going to start taking the beginner quilting class taught by Sandy Raber (sananddandy). Since it is a half hour drive from my house, my parents are out of town, and my friends who were going to give me a ride decided not to go today, I wasn't able to make it this time. There's always next week. Haha. Ok so I have been familiarizing myself with block quilts and easy patterns like that. And realisticly speaking, looking at these tutorials, it looks as if I will have to pay about $50-$75 per sitting just for fabric and batting. I have heard of people selling quilts and I was wondering if that is even a possibility of block quilts. I don't expect to be able to be really good at quilting right away but I was thinking maybe after I get good. I just think it will be hard to keep up quilting if it costs what it does and I only make $20 a month. So I suppose when it boils down to it my two questions are:
    -Can block quilts be expected to sell?
    -If so, how much can I ask for them that is not too expensive but I will make good profit?
    My suggestion would be to take the 50-75 dollars you'd spend for one session and buy a couple of the best learn to quilt books.

    And forget selling!
    Bad Spellers of the World
    U N T I E

  8. #8
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    I don't think that you can recover enough to cover both your fabric and time costs through selling quilts unless you're a really well known designer. I agree that table runners and small items are more likely to sell, but you could also consider baby quilts - they make great gifts.

  9. #9
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I don't sell quilts, I just give to family, friends and some people I don't know. I choose what quilt goes to which person, never had anyone refuse them or complain about them. Selling anything depends on location, customers and how cheap things can be bought for. It would be hard to make enough money for your time spent.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
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    You have to be creative to keep your cost down. Use coupons, watch sales, thrift stores, yard sells and CL to name a few ways to save. Don't expect to make a lot but don't sell yourself short either. You will have plenty of time to get stock up before next winter.

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