Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Serger thread

  1. #1
    Senior Member susanwilley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Glen Burnie, MD
    Posts
    803

    Serger thread

    Hello all!
    I have a question on thread. My daughter picked up a large cone of serger thread instead of the quilting thread I asked for. My question is what is the different between serger thread and quilting thread, can I use the serger thread for piecing or quilting my quilt?
    Susan

  2. #2
    Senior Member Kat Sews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Tn
    Posts
    668
    I use serger thread most of the time. Someone on the board said they had some melt when they ironed, I have not had that problem but my iron is only 1000 watts. Also it is not all cotton, also for me that's not a problem. Try it, if you like it you can save some money.

  3. #3
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Mars
    Posts
    2,027
    I use serger thread for piecing and normal sewing all the time - it's only two-ply, so it is not as strong as a 3-ply thread.

    In quilting, the stitches are a little more likely to break than stitches made with 3-ply thread, especially in areas that are not heavily quilted.

    I haven't noticed this problem with it in quilts that are quilted closely - 1-2" apart.

    Serger thread is usually polyester and some people don't like putting poly in their quilts - personally, I use poly or cotton, depending upon the color, weight and effect that I want.

  4. #4
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Northern Indiana
    Posts
    1,147
    Blog Entries
    14
    I use serger thread on my mid-arm for quilting, but not for piecing

  5. #5
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    8,722
    I know some say its not very strong , but when I go to break it , without cutting, It surprisingly strong. I use it alot for piecing. The poly in it is what is giving it the strenght. I have used some 100 percent cotton thread that was not quite as strong.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Salt Lake City area
    Posts
    307
    I don't like it for anything but serging because it just isn't as uniform as other threads. Take a look at it under a bright light and compare it to "regular" good quality thread - it just isn't the same. It works great for serging because you use 3-4 threads together, but in piecing or quilting you are using only 2 threads (top and bobbin). It certainly isn't the worst stuff in the world, but there are more uniform options. BTW, uniformity matters in things like setting tension and thread breaks.

    Pam

  7. #7
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    4,642
    Blog Entries
    1
    I used serger thread for piecing when I was out of regular thread, and it broke so much I threw the rest of the cone out. I don't remember what brand it was, but I was so frustrated that I swore I'd never do it again. I don't know why it worked just fine in my serger but broke so much in my regular sewing machine....

  8. #8
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Outer Space
    Posts
    9,483
    Here's a link to why you shouldn't use it http://www.thequiltshow.com/os/blog.php/blog_id/3800

    "Can I quilt with serger thread? Bob Purcell says yes, but why would you?

    Most serger thread on the market is the cheapest type of spun polyester thread. When used on a serger, multiple strands of this thread are over locked, resulting in a strong and secure stitch. However, if used as a single thread for quilting, it is weak and fluffy. It doesn't make sense to put two dollars worth of thread onto a $300 quilt. Inexpensive serger thread has a loose twist, is not very smooth, has lots of lint, and is not intended for single-strand use.


    This great tip was found in the School of Threadology Manual. The book and accompanying DVD lay to rest many of the myths we have heard for years, as well as a great 'hands-on' tips to make your sewing smooth sailing. For more great thread tips check out the complete set available through Superior Threads."

  9. #9
    Senior Member susanwilley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Glen Burnie, MD
    Posts
    803
    Thanks for all the responses and suggestions guys!! You were all very helpful!
    Susan

  10. #10
    Super Member callen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Timmins, Ont. Canada
    Posts
    3,464
    Good into to know. Tks for sharing.
    Dance like no one is watching

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.