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Thread: Sewing 6 quilts.....

  1. #11
    RST
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    In your situation, I would find it much more fun and interesting to offer to teach those moms how to make the quilt. You could give them a list of all the supplies, tell them where to purchase,maybe you could offer to buy a quantity of batting or backing and pass the savings along to them. Offer to teach them (as a group) how to make a basic quilt. Give them two dates when you would be available, and if they are really interested, they will figure out how to do it. You may get some quilting buddies out of the deal. If there are steps that they don't feel up to (quilting or binding) you could offer to do those for an hourly rate that you specify in advance-- say $10/hour.

    RST

  2. #12
    Super Member Deborah12687's Avatar
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    I just made the blue jean bear for my Grandson, I only had 1 of the panels. The other quilts I am free to do what I want just so the quilts are single bed size girly quilts and want warm and natural batting and simple quilting. I gave them all a call and asked them what they are willing to pay for the quilts and they all agreed to $100.00 per quilt.

  3. #13
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RST
    In your situation, I would find it much more fun and interesting to offer to teach those moms how to make the quilt. You could give them a list of all the supplies, tell them where to purchase,maybe you could offer to buy a quantity of batting or backing and pass the savings along to them. Offer to teach them (as a group) how to make a basic quilt. Give them two dates when you would be available, and if they are really interested, they will figure out how to do it. You may get some quilting buddies out of the deal. If there are steps that they don't feel up to (quilting or binding) you could offer to do those for an hourly rate that you specify in advance-- say $10/hour.

    RST
    Sounds like a perfect solution .... plus the Moms can get an appreciation of the amount of work it takes to do the job! And best case scenario, they become quilters!

  4. #14
    mim
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    I always charged $50 for a baby (playtime) quilt. No matter what the design was. Sometimes it was a panel which I handquilted the outline and embroidered the childs name.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Julie in NM

    If you DON"T want to do the project(s), charge a crazy amount of money and just watch the jaws drop. That's what I do. If I don't want to do the quilt, I say I charge 10.00 and hour and there will be a minimum of 40 hours of work into the baby quilt.
    I do this too!

  6. #16
    Junior Member K.P.'s Avatar
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    $10/square foot, this was a quote from a textile artist.

  7. #17
    Senior Member gigi10's Avatar
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    I ran into this. I made a little purple quilt from my scraps for one of my gr daughters. She and her friend were having a problem because they both wanted it. My DIL told me about this as a funny story. I went to my scrap basket and made the 2nd one for the little one who didn't have one. When it was done I got the address and mailed it to her. Her gr parents don't quilt. I literally made the whole thing up, the pattern......and I agreed with myself that everything would have to come from my scrap basket.....The little girl and her Mom were very surprized and pleased. a couple of yrs ago I did this. Recently we were havind sprinkler problems and that is what her Daddy does. He drove from Houston, about an hour each way. He knows his business. It took him 2 days, so that was 4 x .....up and back. My DH promised him a specific amount just for coming . Daddy gave my DH the bill. even with the specific $ on top of it.......He cut the price. I just made the little quilt from a GIGI's heart. It came back to us. I don't think I could find 6 quilts in my scrap basket right now. I just used all of them to make a scrap quilt. If this is something you want to do from your heart, no $, then do it. IF THIS could get out of hand, be bigger than you want, more time than you want to give it.....say NO to all of it. If it is something you want to do, I agree with the supply list idea. Sometimes people get caught in the moment and after it cools, they aren't interested any more.

  8. #18
    cdufur's Avatar
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    Good idea!
    Quote Originally Posted by Glassquilt
    Give the mothers a supply list with the fabric, thread & batting needed and list your labor as $$$ & approximate time. (Give yourself extra time for what ifs. Customer never complains if you deliver early.)

    If they buy the supplies you know they are serious. Each of you can sign a copy of the supply list as a contract.

    Another thing to consider is the boredom factor of making the very same quilt repeatedly. If you don't like to make the same thing over & over, can you change it enough to satisfy your creative muse and the mother's expectations.

    Add to bottom of list any changes mom makes will cause a change in your labor charge.

  9. #19
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    Its been my experiance that everyone wants something handmade but few are willing to pay for what its really worth. "Ah she sewes what can i get out of her"
    Be very careful with your pricing.
    I had a distant family member HOUND me for a bag "just like your daughters", once I suggested charging her she shut up quick.

  10. #20
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deborah12687
    This past sunday I gave my 3 year old Grandson his quilt for his Birthday. He really liked it but he had one problem all the little girls that were at the party wanted the quilt and they were fighting over it. I just used a panel of a teddy bear on a tracter and added a flannel boarder of blue and white blocks. As the day went on I was asked by 6 mothers to make quilts for there kids. What should I charge for the quilts?
    Search on this board for the post about the actual cost of making a quilt. You'll be shocked! Here's MY 2 cents. Charge enough so that you won't begrudge the time if you really don't want to do them and don't know how to say no. Seriously, $200 would not be out of line for a child's size quilt. so if you'd be willing to make them for that price, and they are willing to pay it, go ahead. If you really want to make quilts out of the kindness of your heart ( which I don't!) do that. But don't let people take advantage of your good nature !

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