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Thread: Sewing Together Some Batting Scraps

  1. #21
    Junior Member Mary L Booth's Avatar
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    Cut some strips of fusible interfacing and butt them together and iron the interfacing to them. I do this all the time.
    Mary in TX

  2. #22
    Super Member nhweaver's Avatar
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    I bought batting seam tape to put batting pieces together, I haven't used it yet, as my projects lately go to the long armer. I got it at Keepsake Quilting. It is MADE IN USA, in good ole Limerick Maine. Try to use MADE IN USA as much as possible.
    If life gives you lemons, make a margarita.

  3. #23
    Senior Member happyquiltmom's Avatar
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    I trim the two pieces and butt the edges together, then use a very large whip stitch by hand, and don't pull tightly. My goal is to get the pieces together without compressing the batting, so that the seam is not detected after the quilting is finished. This has worked well for me for the last 30 years.
    Cindy

    Curator of an 1889 Singer model 27 Fiddlebase Treadle, a 1951 Singer Centennial Featherweight, a 1956 Singer 401A, and a 1982 Bernina 830 Record.

  4. #24
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    I have joined pieces of batting to use in coasters, used a lot of them up. I was surprised how well it worked and could not feel the seam. Great way to use up batting, which takes up even more room than fabric. Thanks for bringing this topic up!

  5. #25
    Senior Member GemState's Avatar
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    I do like Mary Booth......cut 2 or 2 1/2 inch strips of fusible interfacing, butt the pieces together and join them. I have better luck if I use a press cloth and a little steam. The fusible just sinks right in to the batting. I almost always use W and N.

  6. #26
    Super Member ManiacQuilter2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mary L Booth View Post
    Cut some strips of fusible interfacing and butt them together and iron the interfacing to them. I do this all the time.
    Mary in TX
    I use a very lightweight fusible interfacing (cut into strips) making sure that the edges are straight so the edges butt up next to one another before pressing. No one can tell because it's so much smoother then a zig zag stitch. I always have used Hobbs Cotton batting.
    A Good Friend, like an old quilt, is both a Treasure and a Comfort

  7. #27
    Super Member JoyjoyMarie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyquiltmom View Post
    I trim the two pieces and butt the edges together, then use a very large whip stitch by hand, and don't pull tightly. My goal is to get the pieces together without compressing the batting, so that the seam is not detected after the quilting is finished. This has worked well for me for the last 30 years.
    Me too, (except the 30 years) and I really enjoy the process and the use of all my materials that way.
    KEEP CALM and CARRY ON!!

  8. #28
    Super Member sniktasemaj's Avatar
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    I haven't tried it yet, but plan to do so soon. Thanks for all the advise.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peckish View Post
    I don't even bother to sew them together. I think this technique works best with longarm frames, but I simply lay the second piece of batting next to the first, on top of the backing. The quilting holds it all together.


    This is what I've done, too. I figure if they are quilted, they aren't going anywhere. But reading all these posts just now made me quake until I got to yours. I figured I had been making a big boo-boo, even though I've used this patched together batting only in wall hangings or other small pieces.

  10. #30
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    The last quilt I made, I laid the back on the floor and put batting pieces over it to cover. (Lots of pieces.) Then I moved each piece, put Elmer's School Glue onto the back, and put the piece back down. They were all overlapped about 1/2 inch. After everything was down, I used regular fabric glue, the kind that does not wash out, and put a drop every few inches under each overlap. That way I knew the batt would not move and shift if I hadn't quilted closely enough. The quilt had to stay on the floor for a day (bummer) so that the fabric glue could dry in place.
    When I FMQed it, I could feel the layers with my fingers, especially where more than two layers came together on corners, but normally you would never notice.

    Small, really scrap pieces of batt do not go into dog beds here. Only fabric scraps (the lint) go there. I have a small wastebasket lined with strong fabric sewn into a pillowcase-like shape, and all the batting scraps go into it. I try to pull the batt pieces apart so they are more fluffy. Then when the basket is full, it is sewn shut, and the resulting "pillow" can be donated to the food pantry or Salvation Army etc. I try to get them stuffed quite firmly. I've made dozens of these. Our food pantry lady loves them.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

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