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Thread: The shrinkage of batting

  1. #1
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    The shrinkage of batting

    For those that do not shrink their fabic before quilting, ( I use to but because I live in an Apartment now and have to do it at the laundry room, I don't do it anymore.) I want to know when it says batting shrinks 3 to 5 %, what does the quilt look like after it is washed, is it puckered a lot or a little or not at all. I hope you understand my question, it is hard for me to explain what I really want to know. I am thinking of using the fusible batting.

  2. #2
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    What is a little to some is a lot to another.
    Also, whether your fabric has been pre-shrunk or not.

    The best way for you to get that answer would be to do some sample pieces, (eg. placemats) and see what they look like after.
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  3. #3
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    it does make the quilt a bit "wrinkled" but not bad. battings differ. read the labels. there are battings that don't shrink. I usually use fusible and dont' mind the look at all. it's still a nice flat quilt.

  4. #4
    Super Member DebbE's Avatar
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    The shrinkage of batting (and the quilt, when completed) is what makes it a nicer quilt, to me. Others who receive my quilts feel the same way, based on comments made when they receive them. I use Warm & Natural, and love how the finished products look.

  5. #5
    Super Member dakotamaid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MadP View Post
    For those that do not shrink their fabic before quilting, ( I use to but because I live in an Apartment now and have to do it at the laundry room, I don't do it anymore.) I want to know when it says batting shrinks 3 to 5 %, what does the quilt look like after it is washed, is it puckered a lot or a little or not at all. I hope you understand my question, it is hard for me to explain what I really want to know. I am thinking of using the fusible batting.
    You don't have to "wash" batting to get it to shrink. Just put it in the bath tub in hot or warm water and let it sit for a while. Swhiss (is this a word?) it around for a bit and than pull the plug on the tub and let it drain. Squeeze, do not wring, the batting out and put it out on the balcony to dry out enough to put in the dryer. This is how my sis does hers.
    Have a great day sewing and remember to "not sweat the small stuff"!!



  6. #6
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    I use Hobbs 80/20 fusible batting and I wash my quilts when I finish FMQing them. I put it in the top load washer and do a brief wash and pin cycle. I then put my quilt in the dryer and get it out when still damp. I lay a sheet out on the carpet in the spare bedroom. If I want the quilt nice and flat, I lay my quilt on the sheet and pin the edges to the carpet and let it dry that way. I have minimal shrinkage( it looks almost the same as before washing)

  7. #7
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Here's a picture of a quilt that was not pre-shrunk in any way - neither the batting nor fabric. It turned out sooooo soft and snuggly. Hope this helps.

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  8. #8
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    My quilts look crinkly but it doesn't look bad, the quilting is what stabilizes the batting. It doesn't look puckered to me, just like those homey style old quilts. I always wonder why people don't like their quilts to look as they did many years ago

  9. #9
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    It would depend on the fabric. I made a quilt recently with Kona white and jelly rolls.
    No prewashing. After quilting and washing it looked very crinkly. Love it.

  10. #10
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    To be honest, I would not recommend using fusible batting except possibly on crib quilts. It can be very difficult to apply to large quilts and is very unforgiving if you make a mistake. Basting spray is much more forgiving (I use 505).

    I like the softness that comes with batting that shrinks 3-5%. Recently I've been using mostly Hobbs 80/20, but when that runs out I am going to try Quilters Dream cotton. After visiting a recent quilt show, I am realizing that I prefer a flatter batting for machine quilting.

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