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Thread: Small quilting patterns

  1. #1
    Steve's Avatar
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    I知 finally quilting the doll quilt for a co-workers grandchild, and have a question. The piece is quite small, I知 just able to get it comfortably in a hoop and considered doing it without one for a while (like the Hawaiian), but the question is this:

    When you have a small but intricate pattern, do you twist the needle/ fabric to load it or just take a couple stitches at a time, turn, etc.? I tried the first method, gently pushing the fabric afterwards to release the stitches in the quilted area which looks good, and undoubtedly saves time, but I知 wondering if there are unseen drawbacks in doing it this way. I mean really, the patterns are small enough that I知 not really saving a huge chunk of time anyway.

    When the curlicues are tiny though, what do 惣ou do?

  2. #2
    Super Member vicki reno's Avatar
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    I don't do much hand quilting, but used to just take a few stitches and then turn. I think it is a matter of perference more than anything else, especially on a piece that small.

  3. #3
    Steve's Avatar
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    Parts of the pattern are so small that I really have no choice in the matter. I just wonder if manhandling the fabric, like I've been doing, is going to 'damage the goods' as it were.

  4. #4
    Super Member Moonpi's Avatar
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    You can combine, using single stitches around tight spots and loading the needle for longer runs. I'm not sure of the scale you're working with, but overall, they would look the same.

    If you see any wracking, loosen the stitches, stop, and take it to the ironing board and press to block it back into shape before adding more... unless you are going for a primative look.

  5. #5
    Steve's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moonpi
    You can combine, using single stitches around tight spots and loading the needle for longer runs. I'm not sure of the scale you're working with, but overall, they would look the same.

    If you see any wracking, loosen the stitches, stop, and take it to the ironing board and press to block it back into shape before adding more... unless you are going for a primative look.
    Not quite sure what 'wracking' is, other than my nerves and what the last two year old's birthday party did to them. :lol:

  6. #6
    Super Member Moonpi's Avatar
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    Loretta, so many tops were started and never finished. Some people died, some got bored, or life got in the way. As long as you are not representing the combined work as antique, no one should have issues. I've done the same thing, and it really left me connected to history. Let's face it, about the only thing unquilted tops are used for are tablecloths, a much sadder fate, in my eyes.

  7. #7
    Super Member Harmony's Avatar
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    So I guess UFOs are not a new thing!!!!

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