Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 34

Thread: So what's in your quilt?

  1. #11
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    9,309
    read the packages and choose batting that allows you to quilt your quilt the way you want to- i seldom purchase my batting ahead of time- when i do i usually wind up having to switch it because i choose a different way to quilt it-
    some batts are good for hand quilting-some not so much
    some batts allow you to quilt up to 10" apart
    some batts need to be quilted every 2"
    some batts shrink more than others- some batts hold up to lots of washing/drying-dragging around-
    some batts are more fragile and are more for the quilts that get put away.

    the package holds a wealth of information

    i keep a (batting journal) i try every new batt i come across-
    i cut a 6" square from it- to add to my journal- i include where it came from, how much it cost- it's fiber content- the loft, the quilting recommendations- the care instructions---then after i use it i add notes on my feelings about it- did i love using it? did i hate it? did it cause alot of lint? and how did it wash up after the quilt was finished-
    that way if something goes on sale i can check to see how i feel about it --- it might not be such a good deal if i hate the batt.

    i love wool batting but it tends to be a bit expensive-
    i love dream poly for kids quilts- it takes a beating and washes up beautifully
    i love warm & natural for many long-armed quilts
    i love hobbs heirloom batting for hand quilting
    there are so many wonderful batts to choose from!

  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    699
    I have used cotton batting in one quilt and decided I did not like it. It is too flat and too hard to quilt and has to be quilted too close. I hand quilt. I much prefer poly. Poly comes in several different lofts. I don't like the low loft because it too is flat. I like to see dimension in my quilts.

  3. #13
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    185
    Blog Entries
    24
    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl
    read the packages and choose batting that allows you to quilt your quilt the way you want to- i seldom purchase my batting ahead of time- when i do i usually wind up having to switch it because i choose a different way to quilt it-
    some batts are good for hand quilting-some not so much
    some batts allow you to quilt up to 10" apart
    some batts need to be quilted every 2"
    some batts shrink more than others- some batts hold up to lots of washing/drying-dragging around-
    some batts are more fragile and are more for the quilts that get put away.

    the package holds a wealth of information

    i keep a (batting journal) i try every new batt i come across-
    i cut a 6" square from it- to add to my journal- i include where it came from, how much it cost- it's fiber content- the loft, the quilting recommendations- the care instructions---then after i use it i add notes on my feelings about it- did i love using it? did i hate it? did it cause alot of lint? and how did it wash up after the quilt was finished-
    that way if something goes on sale i can check to see how i feel about it --- it might not be such a good deal if i hate the batt.

    i love wool batting but it tends to be a bit expensive-
    i love dream poly for kids quilts- it takes a beating and washes up beautifully
    i love warm & natural for many long-armed quilts
    i love hobbs heirloom batting for hand quilting
    there are so many wonderful batts to choose from!
    So, if i wanted it to look more like a bedspread--not flat, your recommendation would be?

  4. #14
    crafty gal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    224
    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl
    read the packages and choose batting that allows you to quilt your quilt the way you want to- i seldom purchase my batting ahead of time- when i do i usually wind up having to switch it because i choose a different way to quilt it-
    some batts are good for hand quilting-some not so much
    some batts allow you to quilt up to 10" apart
    some batts need to be quilted every 2"
    some batts shrink more than others- some batts hold up to lots of washing/drying-dragging around-
    some batts are more fragile and are more for the quilts that get put away.

    the package holds a wealth of information

    i keep a (batting journal) i try every new batt i come across-
    i cut a 6" square from it- to add to my journal- i include where it came from, how much it cost- it's fiber content- the loft, the quilting recommendations- the care instructions---then after i use it i add notes on my feelings about it- did i love using it? did i hate it? did it cause alot of lint? and how did it wash up after the quilt was finished-
    that way if something goes on sale i can check to see how i feel about it --- it might not be such a good deal if i hate the batt.

    i love wool batting but it tends to be a bit expensive-
    i love dream poly for kids quilts- it takes a beating and washes up beautifully
    i love warm & natural for many long-armed quilts
    i love hobbs heirloom batting for hand quilting
    there are so many wonderful batts to choose from!
    Thanks for all this information!

  5. #15
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    4,265

  6. #16
    Senior Member COYOTEMAGIC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Only the Shadow Knows........
    Posts
    972
    Blog Entries
    3
    I use whatever I have on hand.I have an industrial sized roll of a cotton weave (heavy T-shirt material) that I use for batting. I also use old sheets for batting and backing.

  7. #17
    Super Member Edie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    St. Paul, Minnesota
    Posts
    2,281
    Blog Entries
    1
    Warm and Natural. Edie

  8. #18
    Member taciage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Western NC
    Posts
    43
    I like Dream cotton ( no dies or pesticides) and warm and natural. it comes in different lofts, so I can send completed gifts to Florida, Michigan, California or anywhere in between! Dream Cotton also now has a wool batting that is light weight and quilts beautifully! My luck with Hobbs the few times I had to use it was not positive-- bearding and pilling, so I don't choose to use it.

  9. #19
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    3,949
    Thin (cotton) batting is easier to quilt than lofty batting. If you are new at it that might be the best place to start. Don't run to do Trapunto etc until you've done a couple...

  10. #20
    Senior Member cpfrog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    403
    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl
    read the packages and choose batting that allows you to quilt your quilt the way you want to- i seldom purchase my batting ahead of time- when i do i usually wind up having to switch it because i choose a different way to quilt it-
    some batts are good for hand quilting-some not so much
    some batts allow you to quilt up to 10" apart
    some batts need to be quilted every 2"
    some batts shrink more than others- some batts hold up to lots of washing/drying-dragging around-
    some batts are more fragile and are more for the quilts that get put away.

    the package holds a wealth of information

    i keep a (batting journal) i try every new batt i come across-
    i cut a 6" square from it- to add to my journal- i include where it came from, how much it cost- it's fiber content- the loft, the quilting recommendations- the care instructions---then after i use it i add notes on my feelings about it- did i love using it? did i hate it? did it cause alot of lint? and how did it wash up after the quilt was finished-
    that way if something goes on sale i can check to see how i feel about it --- it might not be such a good deal if i hate the batt.

    i love wool batting but it tends to be a bit expensive-
    i love dream poly for kids quilts- it takes a beating and washes up beautifully
    i love warm & natural for many long-armed quilts
    i love hobbs heirloom batting for hand quilting
    there are so many wonderful batts to choose from!
    SUPER IDEA of the "Batting Journal" and documenting the different types... I've done this with the quilt tops, but never thought of the diff. battings I've used. Thanks for the tip!

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.