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Thread: Some intresting about singers sewing machines

  1. #1
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    I was researching something else, and I came across this topic. Now, Perhaps others know this, but I did not, and am giving people a heads up. No wonder my 1980s sewing machine from singer works better...
    I got the paragraph from http://www.geocities.com/claw.geo/singer.html

    During the Second World War, Singer (as the other American sewing machine companies) ceased sewing machine production in favor of manufacturing equipment deemed more necessary to the war effort. As a result, this led to a great shortage of sewing machines immediately after the war. By the mid-1950s, however, the market had become flooded with foreign made machines. European models possessed more features than the typical American models. However, the greatest threat came from Japan which dumped millions of cheap clone models on the market, driving all of the other American sewing machine companies out of business. The American manufacturers could not compete with cheap Asian labor and Japanese industries (paid for largely by the American taxpayer as a result of the Marshall Plan).


    While smaller American manufacturers including New Home and White struggled and eventually succumbed to the onslaught of the Japanese companies, Singer was able to survive. However, Singer fared little better, with its market share having shrunk from 75% to a mere 25%.


    Although the Singer Company still exists, they no longer manufacture sewing machines. After closing their last American factory in the 1980s, the company eventually sold off its sewing machine related assets. Singer is currently an aerospace company which does business mainly with the Department of Defense. The Singer sewing machine brand name is currently owned by the German Pfaff sewing machine company. Today, machines labeled SINGER are generally “badged” models manufactured in Asia by foreign companies.


    A number of replica sewing machines have been or are currently being manufactured in Asia and labeled as SINGER machines. These include the Models 15, 20, and 221. They are currently being sold in North America as “vintage reproduction” machines. Collectors should be aware that these machines are of generally inferior quality to antique examples. Moreover, their relatively high prices do not make them a good buy.


  2. #2
    Super Member Barbm's Avatar
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    My husband worked for Singer Company in the mid 70s. They made electric heating elements. He bought a Touch N Sew machine (back then $400+) before the company moved to NJ and closed operations here in PA. His ex did not sew and could not figure out the machine. We bought it from her in '96 for $35. I still have it, it's a workhorse.

    The people that lost their jobs with Singer formed their own company. My husband worked there for many years. That's where I met him. :)

    Barbm

  3. #3
    reneebobby's Avatar
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    Quite interesting thank you

  4. #4
    Moderator tlrnhi's Avatar
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    I have my moms Touch N Sew that she bought back in the 70s. It needs a GOOD cleaning, but I'm sure after it gets one, it'll be as good as new.

  5. #5
    Super Member lfw045's Avatar
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    I just cleaned and oiled my Touch and Sew 648 that I was given......used to be my aunts. If you have the book for it it shows you exactlywhat to do. It's a nice machine.

    I have the Singer Creative Touch 1030 and it is still a workhorse. I love the old Singers.......I have my mom's still at Dad's that I need to work on the tension all of a sudden.......it was made in 1952. I intend to pull the book and work on it when I get back up there.

  6. #6
    Super Member ania755's Avatar
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    :D :D Thank you Wendy...
    That explains it all.....
    I had 2 singer machines before and couldn't understand why SINGER was so famous for being good...Both of them were horrible.....
    I finally switched to kenmore (worked well for good 15 years and then the gear broke )....we have been looking everywhere and couldn't get the gear...DH promise to actually "make me a gear for this machine)...while its waiting...I swithed to Brother machines....They are my best option now...
    No singer for me.....never again.....
    Thanks a lot for the article....

  7. #7
    Senior Member Nita's Avatar
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    Interesting article. Thank you for sharing.
    I have a question;How can I find out what the model number is on my Singer Featherweight Machine? I purchased it two summers ago. It is a great little machine. The place where I took it to be cleaned/oiled, etc. said it was in great condition and that the $350 I paid was a very fair price. I wish I would have thought to ask him if he knew what model # it was. Does anyone know how I can find out?

  8. #8
    Super Member mimisharon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barbm
    My husband worked for Singer Company in the mid 70s. They made electric heating elements. He bought a Touch N Sew machine (back then $400+) before the company moved to NJ and closed operations here in PA. His ex did not sew and could not figure out the machine. We bought it from her in '96 for $35. I still have it, it's a workhorse.

    The people that lost their jobs with Singer formed their own company. My husband worked there for many years. That's where I met him. :)

    Barbm
    The best machine I ever had, by far, was the Singer Golden Touch and Sew! It had metal parts and worked even when dirty. It broke my heart to set that poor burned (literally) machine on the curb for the trash men in 1985. Someone broke into my home and set it on fire. We think and thought then, they were walking round my house with a cigarette lighter to see and caught some patterns and fabric on fire that were on my machine cabinet that I was working on. I was at work when it was set on fire.

  9. #9
    Super Member Carol W's Avatar
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    If you look on the base of your featherweight, there is a set of letters and numbers.

    Look on this website and it will tell you what year it was made.

    http://www.planetpatchwork.com/fweight.htm

  10. #10
    Senior Member Nita's Avatar
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    Thanks Carole. I found out that the date of my my Featherweight is 1956. I was only six years old! For anyone interested, here is a website that sells featherweight parts:
    www.221parts.com/


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