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Thread: Space Bags for Quilt Storage--Good or bad?

  1. #1
    Member pseudoquilter's Avatar
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    Question Space Bags for Quilt Storage--Good or bad?

    Can quilts be safely stored in the "space bags" that have the air compressed out to save space? I have so many quilts that the "space bag" idea would save storage space. I have read that a quilt has to breathe.
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Super Member NikkiLu's Avatar
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    I do not know about "breathing" but those bags that I have used ALL wind up getting the air back in them. So, they did not work properly.
    Nikki in MO

  3. #3
    Super Member SouthPStitches's Avatar
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    Personally, don't think I'd put finished quilts in the space bag, but it would be an excellent space saver for unused batting.

  4. #4
    Super Member Val in IN's Avatar
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    I've never had any luck with Space Bags. They ALWAYS lose the seal when I've used them. I also don't think it's a good idea to store quilts in plastic. Just my opinion of course...
    "I've always been crazy, but it's kept me from going insane!"
    Valarie

  5. #5
    Super Member Rose L's Avatar
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    I would not use them for quilts. Cotton does need to breath or it can begin to break down much the way a compost pile does. It is a natural material. Cotton against any petroleum product or wood product can cause a chemical reaction and is usually what causes the rusty looking marks on old quilts. I store mine in cotton pillow cases in my closet and then air and refold in a different way every 3-4 months. They were all made by my grandmother in the 20's-40's.
    Janome D1822/Janome 4618LE/1946 Singer 15-91 in original cabinet
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  6. #6
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
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    for short term storage ok---but they would need to be taken out (often) fluffed & refolded- or your will get permenent creases/and possible discoloration (since they are not acid free)
    it is never a good idea to store quilts long-term in plastic
    acid free storage containers- are best choice- if you need to pack quilts away- you can get ones that fit under the bed.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  7. #7
    Member pseudoquilter's Avatar
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    Thank you for your information!

  8. #8
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    I use them for storing my batting, Hobbs and W&N cottons. Maybe that isn't such a good idea if what you are saying is true. Sounds logical. Maybe need to rethink the idea. (Or get my act in gear and finish some of these quilts I am making!!)

  9. #9
    Senior Member IAmCatOwned's Avatar
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    It's not a problem. I was told to be sure to air them out every 6 months. They leak after about 4 months and have to be redone anyway. The bigger problem is that some people report an 'odor' on the quilt. Doesn't happen to me so it may have something to do with storage conditions.
    Current piecing: Zig Zag quilt & LOTL (HSTs done, assembling units)
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  10. #10
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    The one thing all fabrics need for their 'health' is air. For that reason, I wouldn't use space bags for much of anything let alone quilts.
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

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