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Thread: Starching a step by step guide?

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Hi everyone,

    I notice lots of people on here have different methods of starching and I was just wondering if someone would be kind enough to write down what they do step by step. I'm a bit confused about the whole thing as I had never even heard of it until I joined the site a couple of days ago.

    Thanks so much in advance! You guys are the best!

  2. #2
    Senior Member nance-ell's Avatar
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    I asked basically the same question recently. Here is the thread: http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-135350-1.htm. You might enjoy reading it.

  3. #3
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    Thanks Nancy!!!!

  4. #4
    Senior Member nance-ell's Avatar
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    You're welcome Beebs. I was recently in the grocery store and picked up a can of "Faultless Premium Professional Starch". The face of the container says "No flaking on dark colors". I'm thinking... yeah right! lol. But I bought it and based on the replies to my post, sprayed a fat quarter pretty heavily to wet the fabric. I did this to several pieces and thought I would wait and let them dry before ironing. However, impatience won and I started ironing the first piece. It ironed out beautifully and there were no flakes!!! I was impressed. I'm also too lazy to measure concentrated liquid starch and dip my fabric (I do remember my mother starching my father's shirts that way). This worked great for me and I was very happy with the way the fabric handled afterward. You learn such awesome tips on the this board!

  5. #5
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    I spray my fabrics until they are damp for regular piecing, and if there are bias edges I soak them. Let them dry and then press them. Cut as usual :D:D:D

  6. #6
    Super Member woody's Avatar
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    I'm here in Australia and just use the Crisp spray starch. (we don't have as many choices here) It really makes a difference.

  7. #7
    Super Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by nance-ell
    You're welcome Beebs. I was recently in the grocery store and picked up a can of "Faultless Premium Professional Starch". The face of the container says "No flaking on dark colors". I'm thinking... yeah right! lol. But I bought it and based on the replies to my post, sprayed a fat quarter pretty heavily to wet the fabric. I did this to several pieces and thought I would wait and let them dry before ironing. However, impatience won and I started ironing the first piece. It ironed out beautifully and there were no flakes!!! I was impressed. I'm also too lazy to measure concentrated liquid starch and dip my fabric (I do remember my mother starching my father's shirts that way). This worked great for me and I was very happy with the way the fabric handled afterward. You learn such awesome tips on the this board!
    I'm a recent convert to the concentrated liquid starch. I mix up relatively small batches at a time in a spray bottle. No dipping, just spritzing. Far more econimical than the spray cans plus I can see exactly how much I have left. No running out in the middle of a project.

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