Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Starching???

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    5
    I just read all of your answers to Kitsie's question about what is the most important thing you've learned about quilting. So many of you said starching. When do you starch???? I think I must be missing out on something really good!

  2. #2
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,665
    Personally, I starch when I iron out the fabric the first time.....helps keep it crisp and easier to cut accurately....

  3. #3
    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Central Indiana (USA)
    Posts
    31,246
    Blog Entries
    194

  4. #4
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    9,034
    Blog Entries
    1
    I don't prewash fabrics, so for general cutting I don't starch; there is enough sizing in the fabric off the bolt to keep my cutting and piecing accurate.

    Backing fabric and fabric to be cut into bias strips I *always* starch heavily with the method I think I described in the other thread (1:1 solution of Sta-Flo and water). I do not prewash before painting the starch on.

    The only fabric I will faithfully prewash and dry (twice) is flannel. Unless it's a rag quilt (which I haven't made yet, but which everyone says not to prewash the flannel for), I then use heavy starch on the flannel fabric before cutting it. Heavy starching keeps the flannel from stretching while I cut and piece, making accuracy while piecing very easy.

    For backing fabric, I find the heavy starching prevents puckers on the back when I machine quilt. (Would not do this if hand quilting!)

    For bias cuts, heavy starch stabilizes the fabric so the strips are even and do not get stretched out from handling while sewing. It also makes any ironed-in creases very sharp.

    I usually don't use spray starch because I am so clumsy with it -- always making a mess with over-spray, and seemingly always using too hot an iron on it while damp and scorching it. However, if I had made up a quilt sandwich and wanted to machine quilt, I wouldn't hesitate to spread out a sheet on the floor and spray starch both the backing and the top to prevent puckers while machine quilting.

  5. #5
    Tiffany's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Idaho Falls
    Posts
    1,909
    I starch when I am going to be piecing, especially a fabric that feels lightweight. The starch helps stabilize the fabric and keeps it from shifting when I am piecing. I also starch when making berries. I use the 'Perfect Circles' mylar circles to make them and it takes a bit of starch to get them perfect. And anything on the bias usually gets starched to death from me.

    I do not use starch when I am appliquing! That said, there are times when starch can come in handy on applique. If you notice the fabric is starting to fray at a point or v, dipping a small brush in some starch and brushing it against the fraying area will help keep it from fraying further. Of course, a little smidge of Fray Check or some of Roxanne's Basting Glue will do the same thing. I think it just depends on what you have on hand and what's easiest at the time.

    For those with Celiac Disease or who are allergic to wheat, you do not want to use commercial spray starches unless they specifically state they are gluten-free. You can make your own starch the hard way, by boiling up some rice in a little bit of water. You'll know it's done when the rice releases its starch into the water, turning it a milky white. It's a bit of work though and I'm lazy. If you don't want to go to the trouble (or waste the rice), you can use potato starch powder or even corn starch powder. I'm allergic to corn so that doesn't work for me but the potato starch does just fine. I imagine tapioca starch would work just as well too. Just thought I'd throw that out there.

  6. #6
    Super Member clem55's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Lexington,Kentucky
    Posts
    6,147
    Blog Entries
    6
    My mom always made cornstarch starch for ironing, funny, I was just thinging about that today, but I don 't remember her easurments. Just that she would boil it on the stove and then would dip items in the hot solution. I just sent hubby to the store to get me a can of spray starch so I could iron wringkles out of a quilt top. It is one my mom embroidered in the early 1970's. Those 12 inch printed blocks you bought at the dime store. She had it set together, but it was too narrow for a full size bed, so I just added a border to it. The whites don't really match, but at least the quilt will be done. I have that one and my butterfly quilt ready to send out for quilting. Hope the lady does a good job. I'm leaving it up to her as I know nothing about machine quilting patterns.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    52
    Sounds like most of you use a homemade starch. I could use corn starch or potato starch powder; I always have one or the other on hand. Two question for this beginner
    1. Does anyone know the ratio for mixing these?
    2. When would you best use liquid starch?
    I think I want to prewash all my fabrics, at least for this first quilt. Any and all comments will be received with great appreciation

  8. #8
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Enid, OK
    Posts
    8,930
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by BKinCO
    Personally, I starch when I iron out the fabric the first time.....helps keep it crisp and easier to cut accurately....
    yep..I wash everything, the line dry and fold away...when I am ready to use, I spritz with water, and let sit in the fridge over night..then I starch and iron!

    LOVE it...

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    52
    At that point do you spray, paint or dip starch?

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    52
    At that point do you spray, paint or dip starch?

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.