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Thread: Stippling

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by woody
    I just did a FMQ course today and some of the tips were, stippling is acually harder than some of the other quilting designs like teardrops as there is no stopping place where you can pause and work out where you want to go next.
    Practice Practice Practice!!! LOL
    A stitch regulator regulates the speed of your machine depending on how fast you move your fabric, a handy tool but not necessary once you practice.
    I would like something to make the fabric slide easier as I have a home made quilting table and although it's smooth the fabric doesn't slide as easy as the bought tables.
    I also had a homemade table (to fit my disability) before I got the longarm. To make the top very smooth, I took those 12" self-sticking floor tiles and put them on the top. Worked like a charm! The top was smoother than a baby's bottom :)

    Just an idea...
    Debbie in Austin

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maia B
    Great answers, I'm learning a lot here. One thing I'll add is that most domestic sewing machines (not long arms or high end embroidery machines) that have a "stipple stitch" produce a 5-9mm wide stippled strip. It's a cute, fun, deco stitch. It does work for quilting through the layers. But it is so small that if you were to try to use it to fill backgrounds, you'd *go crazy *spend hours and miles of thread *end up with cardboard. It's small a close. I have a few stitches like this on my machine and when I use them to quilt a thin strip it's so closely quilted that it's stiff and very flat. Cute and useful on minis. I hope I've explained well.
    Mine was like that too. I never could use it for real quilting stippling, like you would do all over on a quilt top (like I do on the longarm now). But, I finally read something that helped me to make the stipple pattern well...think of it, and draw it with the thread, like dog bones!

    That's all a stipple is - the shape. So, if you draw a bunch of dog bones, in all directions - you've got it. And it looks wonderful! I got a lot of compliments in Houston on this, and I think it's the easiest way to make the 'stipple' shape. Practice drawing in different directions on paper first, then move to quilt.

    Hope this helps,
    Debbie in Austin

  3. #13
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    if you are one who does not drop feed dogs just remember that the feed dogs are tring to pull the fabric forward and back when you want to go left and right. I would think this might damage the bottom of the fabric.

  4. #14
    Super Member sewcrafty's Avatar
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    I was just playing with this yesterday and I had a moment :idea: You know those teflon sheets that you use with your iron for applique. I had an old one, cut a hole for the needle to go through and taped it down on the machine. It actually worked very well.

  5. #15
    Super Member QultingaddictUK's Avatar
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    I don't think it matters on the pattern, at first, just to get it quilted is a really good feeling.

    One of my pupils said her first attempt looked like "turds" :!: and her second like "fried eggs", all I saw was a nicely FMQ quilt, who cares what the pattern is :-D

  6. #16
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    I'm enjoying reading this. As far as dropping the feeds, the day my 301 arrived, I was playing with her and was able to slide the fabric around easily with the feed dogs engaged, so I may try it with them first. My Elna has an adjustable pressure foot and the feeddogs do not drop. It does adjust beautifully to heavy leather or silk organza, but it never allows the fabric any freedom.

    At this time, I am not interested in stippling, but meandering. I need to learn my quilting terms. Lots of these tips will work for both. Keep them coming. By nightfall, I may be brave enough to try on the Quilt for Kids quilt that is on the machine right now. (If I get off here and go finish piecing it.)

  7. #17
    Super Member Pinkiris's Avatar
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    If the feed dogs on your machine don't drop, you can tape a business card over them with a hole cut out of it for the needle. It's also possible that those machines have a "plate" that will cover the feed dogs. I have an older Singer that has one.

    Sue

  8. #18
    Super Member tjradj's Avatar
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    One of the best things that has improved my free motion quilting is following Leah Day's blog: www.freemotionquilting.blogspot.com
    Her blog is my "go to" place for freemotion quilting.
    She has a ton of tips, patterns with videos on how to do them, and she has a web store that sells the supreme slider, machingers gloves, etc.
    The gloves have rubber tips on the fingers to help you move the fabric around.
    The supreme slider has a teflon top and a silicone bottom. It sticks to the flat bed of your machine and makes it more slippery to move your fabric around. I find it a bit awkward because I have a top loading bobbin, so I have to move it every time I change the bobbin, and I can't see the bobbin to know when I'm running low.
    Her videos are amazing. They're also on YouTube but you have to know what to look for.
    She also advocates having your sewing machine in the corner of the room and have a table beside you that goes to the wall and a table behind your machine which goes to the wall.That way you have lots of support for the quilt and it won't hang over the edge causing drag.
    I believe she freemotion quilts with her feed dogs up. I don't, I like them down.
    And, just play with it. If your stippling lines cross or get too close together - no one will shoot you@
    There are NO quilt police!

  9. #19
    Super Member montanajan's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tips - from what everyone is sharing, it appears the biggest deal is to "just do it". I shall begin with small practice pieces or little things I plan to put up in my sewing room - nothing big or fancy. You are all giving me confidence & for that I truly thank you! This board is terrific.

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