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Thread: storing quilts

  1. #1
    f rogers's Avatar
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    I am trying to get pictures of all my quilts. I was at my daughter's home on Sunday and had my camera with me so I could take pictures...when she brought them out she had stored them in those plastic bags where you suck out the air so it makes easier storage.... is this a good way I have some that need to be stored but where i can get them if I want to rotate them around.

  2. #2
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    I have several in space bags and they look fine.

  3. #3
    Super Member dakotamaid's Avatar
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    That is Ok for a short period of time but over time moisture collects. Fabric needs to breath. I use pillowcases and refold those at least once a year maybe twice. JMO :)

  4. #4
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I have several in plastic tubs for up to ten years and they are fine.

  5. #5
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    Probably the "politically correct" way to store quilts is carefully folded in 100% cotton pillowcases which are washed and then rinsed several times to remove all traces of detergent. Then they should be placed low in a closet (higher shelves are hotter) where there is less risk of moisture/humidity. The quilts should be refolded on different lines occasionally.

    Alternately, they can be stored on the guest bed between cotton sheets washed as above, and covered with blanket and bedspread to block any light exposure. Moisture, light, plastic, cedar chest wood, and particularly body oils are the worse 'corrupters' of fibers.

    Most of us use our quilts and don't plan or anticipate them being a 75 year old heirloom some day.

    But as one who collects antique quilts and has had a 225 year old family heirloom quilt, I see the need for better care of our textiles when they are 'young'. My family quilt is now at the Textile Museum of Colonial Williamsburg because it was "dead" by the time it came under my care and could no longer be used or displayed safely yet had historical significance and provenance.

    Jan in VA

  6. #6
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    I lay my quilts flat on an extra bed. When company comes and I need the bed for use, I fold the quilts temporarily. I keep the room dark so the sun won't fade the quilts.

  7. #7
    Super Member snipforfun's Avatar
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    I came across this blog giving a way to fold quilts so you don't get those fold marks. It came from a magazine in 2006. http://appliqueandpatches.blogspot.c...t-folding.html

  8. #8
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jan in VA
    Probably the "politically correct" way to store quilts is carefully folded in 100% cotton pillowcases which are washed and then rinsed several times to remove all traces of detergent. Then they should be placed low in a closet (higher shelves are hotter) where there is less risk of moisture/humidity. The quilts should be refolded on different lines occasionally.

    Alternately, they can be stored on the guest bed between cotton sheets washed as above, and covered with blanket and bedspread to block any light exposure. Moisture, light, plastic, cedar chest wood, and particularly body oils are the worse 'corrupters' of fibers.

    Most of us use our quilts and don't plan or anticipate them being a 75 year old heirloom some day.

    But as one who collects antique quilts and has had a 225 year old family heirloom quilt, I see the need for better care of our textiles when they are 'young'. My family quilt is now at the Textile Museum of Colonial Williamsburg because it was "dead" by the time it came under my care and could no longer be used or displayed safely yet had historical significance and provenance.

    Jan in VA
    thanks, jan, for that wonderful explanation

  9. #9
    Super Member calla's Avatar
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    I make pillowcases out of old sheets.........calla

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by f rogers
    I am trying to get pictures of all my quilts. I was at my daughter's home on Sunday and had my camera with me so I could take pictures...when she brought them out she had stored them in those plastic bags where you suck out the air so it makes easier storage.... is this a good way I have some that need to be stored but where i can get them if I want to rotate them around.
    not for long...cotton fabrics need to breathe! YES, they are considered a living fiber because they do breathe...when sealed up for long periods they dry rot! She needs to take them and hang them out on a line every 3 months or so!

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