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Thread: Is there an easy way??????

  1. #1
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    Is there an easy way??????

    I just got my new longarm and am having trouble using a panthograph. My problem is changing the laser position when I complete a row and want to begin on the next row. Is there a secret to it? The girl who delivered my machine showed me once. But, I was so bombarded with all the info she threw at me that I didn't clearly understand. Can anybody give me some pointers?
    Be the best that you can be at everything you do.

  2. #2
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    I'm waiting to read this thread. I don't have a lazer on mine but am thinking about adding.
    http://www.oregonquilting.net
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  3. #3
    Senior Member kristakz's Avatar
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    What kind of problem are you having? I usually roll the quilt forward, then drop the needle into a recognizable point (a corner, or a cross, or something). Align the laser so that it is shining on that spot on the partial pattern at the bottom of the pantograph. Mine is easy to adjust - just tap/twist it in the direction it needs to go. Make sure the needle is sitting loosely in the fabric - ie you don't have the quilt pulled to one side with the machine. When you raise the needle, the laser should still point at the intersection you were using, and the machine should still be sitting exactly over it. Now, you can move the machine to start the next row.

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    Senior Member QuiltingCrazie's Avatar
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    If I understand your question correctly I hope this helps. When I finish a row and move the machine to and roll up for the next row I don't move the laser right away. First I test where the last row is by moving the the machine and over the quilting on the quilt and see where my laser is pointing on the pantograph. Then I line the laser with the same point on the pantograph that I'm over with the quilt. I then test the new row with the laser, the highest points and lowest points and find my starting and stopping points. If I adjust the laser at all in the process I redouble check all the previous points. I use a friends machine or I would take pictures, it took me a couple quilts to understand how to line the rows up so the quilting was even throughout. Happy quilting!!
    *Rachel*

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    Super Member wesing's Avatar
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    When I roll my quilts up, I lock the rail down, then do a "test run" with the laser, and the machine not running with teh presser foot up. I can watch the needle area and make sure the new row nests into the previous one without overlapping or leaving too much space. If I need to, I stop the machine at one of the upper "nesting" points and roll the quilt up or down to get the spacing right. The only problem I have is when I get to the end of the quilt and have to try to adjust the spacing to end the quilting on a full row.

    Darren

  6. #6
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    I remember having problems when I started. Make sure your panto has a partial design on it for the next row. If it doesn't you can trace off the very top of the panto (about 2 inches) and then transfer that to the bottom of the pattern. Your table acts as a tracing table if you put a lamp under it. Once you have this done, advance your quilt to the area to start your second row. Baste the sides down first. Then find a spot on the bottom of the row where you just quilted and realign your laser to match that spot. I then just make sure that my laser is following the panto with my stitching. Once this is done move your laser to a spot on your panto where you partially traced the design for the second row. (This will move your machine to an area on the quilt which has not been quilted yet) I pick out a point or something that is easy to spot, lock your machine so it doesn't move and then move your laser to the same point on
    on the pattern. Unlock your machine and just follow the pattern with the light checking to make sure you don't cross over the previous row you stitched and everything lines up. I found this to be one of those things that just gets easier the more you do it.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Toni C's Avatar
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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KiLZA...eature=related Hope this goes through. 1-4 parts

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    Quote Originally Posted by #1piecemaker View Post
    I just got my new longarm and am having trouble using a panthograph. My problem is changing the laser position when I complete a row and want to begin on the next row. Is there a secret to it? The girl who delivered my machine showed me once. But, I was so bombarded with all the info she threw at me that I didn't clearly understand. Can anybody give me some pointers?
    I don't own a longarm, nor will I ever be able to, but I do have a question. With something as important as a longarm in the art/craft of quilting, and as expensive as that machine is, how can they come into your home or shop, set it up, bombard you with instructions and leave!!!??? Don't they provide an instruction book for the longarm and instruction books for any added on feature that you buy? My word it sounds like they kind of leave you high and dry! Boy, I'd be all over them like a blanket to provide me with decent instructions. Fabric and batting are too expensive to be fooling around trying figure out your longarm. You need that to practice your quilting designs. Just saying.
    Last edited by majormom; 09-14-2012 at 05:07 AM. Reason: oh, I just get carried away when I'm amazed and have to remember to edit where needed for a plainer thought. Fibro funk.

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    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    Thanks for all of the good info and the video. It has helped. I am more of a visual learner so it may take me longer than most. For one, my machine has a30 inch throat and I don't have to move it as often as most. Another problem is that when I go to move my laser, it is getting lost because of the way my handles are sitting. I may have to adjust them. Seems like I just can't get everything to work for me all at the same time. heheeh!
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  10. #10
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by majormom View Post
    I don't own a longarm, nor will I ever be able to, but I do have a question. With something as important as a longarm in the art/craft of quilting, and as expensive as that machine is, how can they come into your home or shop, set it up, bombard you with instructions and leave!!!??? Don't they provide an instruction book for the longarm and instruction books for any added on feature that you buy? My word it sounds like they kind of leave you high and dry! Boy, I'd be all over them like a blanket to provide me with decent instructions. Fabric and batting are too expensive to be fooling around trying figure out your longarm. You need that to practice your quilting designs. Just saying.
    She gave me the instruction manual for the machine. I've had to reach for it a couple of times to figure something out. But, I'm not good with written directions. I'm more of a visual learner. Show me something and I can do it. Tell me about it and I'm lost. Give me written instructions and I after it has driven me crazy, I usually can figure it out. But, I am lazy. If someone can show me, why should I get all crazy with the written stuff? (Well, that is my line of thinking, anyway)
    Be the best that you can be at everything you do.

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