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Thread: Are there Regional Styles of Quilts?

  1. #1
    Senior Member yonnikka's Avatar
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    Are there different styles/techniques of quilts and quilting in the different Regions of the World? What do you think? A friend asked me this recently, and I'd love to hear what the talented QB'ers have to say: All Replies are Welcome: Feel free to add a picture to illustrate your thoughts and opinions! To start off, here's a link to the recent Queensland Quilt Show. Prepare to be impressed:

    http://www.qldquilters.com/quilt_show_2011.php

  2. #2
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    Definately! That's what makes QB so great. We can see quilts that we probably would never be able to travel to see. I think there will be less in the future because most quilters have access to computers and can see others work.

  3. #3
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    I would say yes. I've noticed that quilt stores in various areas carry different styles of fabrics so that would reflect their customers' preferences.

  4. #4
    Super Member oksewglad's Avatar
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    I too feel that the lines of regional distinctions will become more blurred due to internet/international exposure. As fabric lines as well as designs become global, regionalism may disappear. Something I don't want to happen.

  5. #5
    Super Member kateyb's Avatar
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    I lived in NW Arkansas for a while and I think more did hand applique than they do in the area of Colorado that I live in now.

  6. #6
    Super Member Mad Mimm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oksewglad
    I too feel that the lines of regional distinctions will become more blurred due to internet/international exposure. As fabric lines as well as designs become global, regionalism may disappear. Something I don't want to happen.
    I don't necessarily think that will happen. Because regions are reflective of their own cultures, the demands will be different regardless of what is available on a global level. I think you will still have that regional flare and that it will be preserved. In addition, you also have the differences in actual technique. I receive a Norwegian quilting magazine and I am constantly amazed at the difference between what is popular there versus here in the states. (An example would be how sparsely they quilt their quilts compared to how heavily we tend to quilt here, and that is not solely due to hand versus machine quilting.) Sure we may be using the same or similar techniques, but we use them in different ways. I also see regional differences just in the quilt show photos from around the US, some are more heavily traditional and others lean more toward art quilts and more innovative techniques. (Of course, some of that could also be the personal tastes of the photographer.)

    I think regional styles definitely exist, and I believe they will continue to do so regardless of the internet and international influences. We may see some styles echoed as those influences are reinterpreted, but I don't think we will lose those regional styles. At least I hope not; I believe they richly enhance quilting as a whole.

  7. #7
    Super Member Greenheron's Avatar
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    Yes, even within a state. The online QuiltIndex illustrates heritage quilts by State. So much to see and learn. For example, in parts of WV no binding was used--the edges of the front and back were folded inward and stitched. A nifty way to finish your quilt made of necessity from scraps and new or old goods for binding impossible to obtain.

  8. #8
    Super Member oksewglad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mad Mimm

    I don't necessarily think that will happen. Because regions are reflective of their own cultures, the demands will be different regardless of what is available on a global level. I think you will still have that regional flare and that it will be preserved. In addition, you also have the differences in actual technique. I receive a Norwegian quilting magazine and I am constantly amazed at the difference between what is popular there versus here in the states. (An example would be how sparsely they quilt their quilts compared to how heavily we tend to quilt here, and that is not solely due to hand versus machine quilting.) Sure we may be using the same or similar techniques, but we use them in different ways. I also see regional differences just in the quilt show photos from around the US, some are more heavily traditional and others lean more toward art quilts and more innovative techniques. (Of course, some of that could also be the personal tastes of the photographer.)

    I think regional styles definitely exist, and I believe they will continue to do so regardless of the internet and international influences. We may see some styles echoed as those influences are reinterpreted, but I don't think we will lose those regional styles. At least I hope not; I believe they richly enhance quilting as a whole.
    Mad Mimm-thanks for your well stated comments. I belong to a small rural quilt guild mostly women in their 60's and above. I am amazed at how many of them have to follow a pattern; they feel comfortable in following others guidelines in regards to design and fabric choices. This is the segment that will cause the lines to blurr, as they do not strike out on their own to create their quilts.
    At the same time I beleive many quilters on this board are far more adventurous than my small quilt group.
    That being said, I am constantly amazed at how quilters interpret their craft. Just look at our "Gallery" and the variety is endless.

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