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Thread: thread basting a quilt

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    What is the best way to thread baste a quilt? I know you start in the middle and work out but do you do all the up and down first then do the side by side (if you are doing a grid) or mix them up? I'm about to baste a queen size quilt and don't want to do it twice! Thanks, Becky

  2. #2
    lin
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    I thread basted all my quilts whether I'm hand or machine quilting. I have to use my dining table as I can't get up and down off the floor like I used to. :) If the quilt is longer than my table, I place it with the quilt in the middle of the table to start off with, and the bottom at one edge. That way I can be sure to secure it nicely at that end with tape. I then smooth the rest as best I can and secure the other ende with those clips you can buy to hold down a tablecloth on a picnic table (I think you can pick them up at Wal-mart). I do only bottom to top if I'm machine quilting, and I make a 3-4" grid if I'm going to hand quilt. I use thread from spools that have nearly run out and a large basting needle. It says "basting needle" on the package, in case you don't have any of those. :) I start at the middle bottom of the quilt and take large stitches (about 1-2") all the way to the other end of the table, take the needle out, and let the rest of that thread just dangle until I move the quilt to finish the part that wouldn't fit on the table the first time. I just work my way out to the edges, and once I've covered all I can, I move the quilt side to side until I've completed the whole bottom part of the quilt. Then I move the quilt again, picking up those threads I let dangle, and finish the top part of the quilt in the same manner as the bottom...smoothing really well, and securing the end with tape or the clips.

    If I'm going to make a grid, I do all one direction first, then turn and repeat all of the above for the other direction. I raise my table up about 6" by placing blocks of wood under the legs so I don't have to bend so much! It really saves the back.

    If you're going to be doing this on the floor/carpet, then just secure both ends and all around the outside before you start. Backing first, then layer the batting and top and smooth well, then secure those as well. There aren't too many mistakes you can make Becky other than not smoothing the layers well enough, which will result in puckering rumples on the back. Don't want those!!! :) Good luck!

  3. #3
    Senior Member annmarie's Avatar
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    That is just a GREAT explanation, Lin. As a beginner I really appreciate it. Thanks.

  4. #4
    lin
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    You're very welcome annamarie. I hope it really does help when it comes time for you to baste. That's my least favorite part of quilting. Probably because I know that as soon as I hit the machine or hoop, all that work is going to start coming right back out. LOL But, it's a necessary evil. :)

  5. #5

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    Mar 2007
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    Thank you! I like the idea of raising the table off the floor! My back isn't what it used to be! Are there elves that might come out at night and do this for me? :lol: Becky

  6. #6
    lin
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    Quote Originally Posted by Becky Robinson
    Are there elves that might come out at night and do this for me? :lol: Becky
    Don't I wish!!!!! :wink:

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