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Thread: Thread size

  1. #1
    Senior Member grammy17's Avatar
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    I bought a cone of thread at a thrift store. 6,000 yards--size 100, 2 cord. Oh yes, 50 cents. It is strong doesn't appear to have ever been used. I intend to used it for piecing. Any opinions on that use. It is Delta thread. Anyone ever heard of it?

  2. #2
    Super Member rusty quilter's Avatar
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    I have never heard of it, but you will know when you sew if it breaks often or throws off too much lint.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Kat Sews's Avatar
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    I sounds like the thread used on factory sewing machines. If it is it was made to use in high speed machine and is stronger than what you would buy in most retail stores. It should work fine in your machine at home. If you don't have the cone thread holder try putting it in a wide mouth jar behind your machine to keep it from dancing off the table.

  4. #4
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
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    that thread is used for bobbins often...being 100 wt you can get ALOT of thread on a bobbin!
    as long as it is still strong (does not break every few inches) it is fine for piecing. i use my thrift store threads for hand piecing alot.

  5. #5
    Senior Member grammy17's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl
    that thread is used for bobbins often...being 100 wt you can get ALOT of thread on a bobbin!
    as long as it is still strong (does not break every few inches) it is fine for piecing. i use my thrift store threads for hand piecing alot.
    I pulled on it as hard as I could and it did not break. I thought right away about the bobbin too. but I always thought you match the top and bottom thread.

  6. #6
    Super Member grann of 6's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grammy17
    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl
    that thread is used for bobbins often...being 100 wt you can get ALOT of thread on a bobbin!
    as long as it is still strong (does not break every few inches) it is fine for piecing. i use my thrift store threads for hand piecing alot.
    I pulled on it as hard as I could and it did not break. I thought right away about the bobbin too. but I always thought you match the top and bottom thread.
    Some machines are fussier about that than others. I keep my fine bobbin thread bobbins in a separate box from reguar thread bobbins. I use the bobbin thread on the embroidery machine. Since you don't know how old the thread is and if it is all cotton or not, I would do some test sewing with it. I find the old threads on my mother's old wooden spools is very brittle and breaks very easily. I have even found Coats & Clark thread breaks easily after being stored a few years.

  7. #7
    Super Member nanna-up-north's Avatar
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    The larger the number, the finer the thread. 100 would be very fine. Size 50 is standand sewing thread. If it is super strong it must be polyester..... try burning a wad of it in an ashtray. If it burns, it's cotton. If it melts, it's poly or some other man-made fiber.

    I like to sew my quilts with 100% cotton thread because I've heard that pure polyester is so strong that over time it will cut the cotton fibers in your quilt. When I've used cotton/poly thread I picked something that wasn't 100% poly and haven't had a problem as yet.

    I'll be interested in hearing how this thread works for you.

  8. #8
    Super Member dglvr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nanna-up-north
    The larger the number, the finer the thread. 100 would be very fine. Size 50 is standand sewing thread. If it is super strong it must be polyester..... try burning a wad of it in an ashtray. If it burns, it's cotton. If it melts, it's poly or some other man-made fiber.

    I like to sew my quilts with 100% cotton thread because I've heard that pure polyester is so strong that over time it will cut the cotton fibers in your quilt. When I've used cotton/poly thread I picked something that wasn't 100% poly and haven't had a problem as yet.

    I'll be interested in hearing how this thread works for you.
    :thumbup: :thumbup: Thanks for that info.

  9. #9
    Super Member Doreen's Avatar
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    lISTEN TO NANA-UP-NORTH.

  10. #10
    Senior Member grammy17's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nanna-up-north
    The larger the number, the finer the thread. 100 would be very fine. Size 50 is standand sewing thread. If it is super strong it must be polyester..... try burning a wad of it in an ashtray. If it burns, it's cotton. If it melts, it's poly or some other man-made fiber.

    I like to sew my quilts with 100% cotton thread because I've heard that pure polyester is so strong that over time it will cut the cotton fibers in your quilt. When I've used cotton/poly thread I picked something that wasn't 100% poly and haven't had a problem as yet.

    I'll be interested in hearing how this thread works for you.
    You are too smart. It made a little flame and melted together into a small blob. Didn't all melt of burn just a small bit. Hard part was getting my old matches to light here in humid FL.

    Also compared it with some thread I've pulled out of some polyester pillow shams--same thickness, strength and flamability.

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