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Thread: Tips for a Quilt Class Instructor :-)

  1. #51
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    My second ever quilt class (supposed to be a rail fence lap quilt) the instructor was a high-school math teacher. She told all of us to "Find the hypotenuse of the triangle". OK, ladies, those of you who have been out of school more than 10 years, quick, what the dickens is the hypotenuse and how do you find it? Then she told all of us beginner quilters that if our seams were off by a needle width, out quilt would be ruined. (Yes, accurate piecing is imperative, but that's not how to explain it to a new quilter!)

    I walked out of the class almost in tears swearing I would never quilt again. Fortunately I phoned my FIRST quilt instructor, who had given me her home phone number, and she invited me to her house to sew with her. We have been best friends now for almost 15 years, and everything I've learned is because of her! Thanks JoeAnn!

    P.S. We STILL laugh about the Hypotenuse. It's become a good giggle!

  2. #52
    Super Member kwhite's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by omak
    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray
    I think if most of the students learn what you planned for them to learn, you will have had a successful class.

    There are some of us that just don't get it the first time - so there is no point in beating yourself up if you did the best you could.

    It is so nice to have an AHA moment - but sometimes that occurs YEARS after the class in question.
    That! Is REALLY the truth!
    Yeah like me and Algebra. I have taken it three times and still waiting for the AH-HA moment.

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwhite
    Quote Originally Posted by omak
    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray
    I think if most of the students learn what you planned for them to learn, you will have had a successful class.

    There are some of us that just don't get it the first time - so there is no point in beating yourself up if you did the best you could.

    It is so nice to have an AHA moment - but sometimes that occurs YEARS after the class in question.
    That! Is REALLY the truth!
    Yeah like me and Algebra. I have taken it three times and still waiting for the AH-HA moment.
    I found that I could understand algebra better if I went from the specific to the general.

    Example: 1 + 2 = 3 versus a + b = c


  4. #54
    Super Member Minda's Avatar
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    Roben,
    Everyone has given you so much great advice. What I want to add really has nothing to do with actually teaching, but I love it when an instructor brings along self-sticking name tags. If your students don't all know each other, it gives them a chance to learn each others' names. Sometimes it's difficult to remember all of the names during the introductions. Have fun with your class. :D

  5. #55
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    Thank you, everyone - your replies were great and have given me a lot to think about.

    I went to the shop on Saturday; we previewed the pattern and discussed various aspects of the class. Since the class is based on a kit we pre-assemble, color won't play a large part of the discussion. We will all be working on pieces that look identical, which will simplify matters a great deal. The 'mechanics' I'm not worried about at all - we've got that covered. (Although the peanut butter sandwich story is giving me pause LOL!) What I wanted to do my best to avoid is inadvertent behavior that leaves someone feeling bad - ie: not feeling part of the group. I cannot for the life of me imagine myself using a class participant's work as an example of what not to do - I think I can provide enough of those from my own work :wink:

    I read a line in a book the other day, a reference to unintended rudeness happening quite frequently. That is the very last place I want to go, and all have you have helped me avoid that pitfall. Thank you so much!

  6. #56
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    you seem to be more aware than most people - I think I would like to be in one of your classes -

    I'm not sure what to do about the student that thinks she knows more than you do and won't shut up or won't wait for you to finish the explanation - (sometimes I might be that one) - duct tape???

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwhite
    Quote Originally Posted by omak
    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray
    I think if most of the students learn what you planned for them to learn, you will have had a successful class.

    There are some of us that just don't get it the first time - so there is no point in beating yourself up if you did the best you could.

    It is so nice to have an AHA moment - but sometimes that occurs YEARS after the class in question.
    That! Is REALLY the truth!
    Yeah like me and Algebra. I have taken it three times and still waiting for the AH-HA moment.
    LOL ... I am getting so old that by now, if something is missing from the equation, I just do not care!
    Not everyone is a math person. If all a teacher manages to teach a student is: Go here for help
    the teacher has been successful!
    I love math, and I can see the practicality of it, but a total class on "suppose you need to know ... " thinking is almost a waste of time!
    That hypotenuse story is just grand!
    At least there is one teacher in the world who doesn't have a job any more?
    I am a Mary Ellen Hopkins girl " I may not be accurate, but I am consistent!" LOL life is really to short to demand perfection. Most people will head toward perfection as they grow in the endeavor .... or, they won't quilt for long.

  8. #58
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    I really liked Mary Ellen Hopkins book "It's Okay If you Sit On My Quilt"

    She made the projects so attainable!

    And for a lot of piecing, consistency is the key!


  9. #59
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    Of course, Loretta - I'd love to have you! Might I suggest, if you'll be sitting by Lisa, to bring some plastic to protect yourself? :lol: :lol: :lol: She causes spew, trust me (and my laptop!) ROTF!!!

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