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Thread: Trying to downsize

  1. #1
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    Trying to downsize

    Being a new year etc. I have the downsizing and organizing bug. When I first got my serger I went crazy and purchased thread for it in lots of different shades etc. It wasn't long before I figured out that changing four threads for every little project was a big pain. I probably own more than 50 spools of serger thread in different colors etc. I don't longarm and only basically machine quilt Linus quilts. What can I use all of that serger thread for? Is it alright for machine quilting or as bobbin thread for embroidery?
    I use my serger to do the basic sewing on my Linus quilts as most of them are just lengths of colorful child friendly prints backed with flannel and layered with batting. I make them envelope style and "birth" them. I sew the "envelope" with the serger, it cuts down on bulk and makes the seam sturdy. Since those seams are hidden I just use white or cream colored thread for them.
    Once they are turned I machine quilt them very simply with a decorative stitch and often varigated thread.

  2. #2
    Super Member deedum's Avatar
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    I too have trying to downsize in my sewing room. A person can just get too much stuff in there and then can't find anything I found. Been cleaning out and purging, sorting and trying to use up some of what I have. I have two sergers and tend to use the old one (they both are oLd)to make burp cloths and receiving blankets for babies. I would think it is fine for machine quilting but I would hesitate with the embrodiery part of it.

  3. #3
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    I use serger thread for machine piecing my quilts all the time. Never had an issue with it. Pick a color and go!

  4. #4
    Senior Member mermaid's Avatar
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    Embroidery thread for the bobbin is usually white(if the piece is not reversible, and is very fine (40wt) so it won't create bulk in the many stitches of a design. The colors would be usable on top if you don't mind a "no sheen" look--which poly & rayon give. Personally, I use the serger cones for piecing all the time. And like you< I have tons of them --some came from factory sewing and I don't even know what fabric items they were used for. But if it's still strong--it is still usable!

  5. #5
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
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    i used up (tons) of serger thread for quilting, piecing, bobbins...my mom had purchased a store going out of business stock & brought home literally hundreds of cones of 'maxi lock' thread- we both used it for about everything for years...there isn't much of it left now- we both sew alot- we never had any problems with any use of it-

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    Embroidery thread for the bobbin is usually white(if the piece is not reversible, and is very fine (40wt) so it won't create bulk in the many stitches of a design

    (bottom line bobbin thread is 60wt---40 wt is a pretty common weight thread for piecing, quilting, garment construction ect---not considered a 'fine thread' at all---60wt-to 100wt threads are more the fine wt threads)
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  6. #6
    Senior Member himnherr's Avatar
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    I was given a ton of cone thread a couple of years ago. I use it both for piecing & quilting. Have not had any problems with it at all.

  7. #7
    Super Member wesing's Avatar
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    When we first got our quilter the only thread we could use with it was Maxi-Lock serger thread (100% polyester). The quilts we have made with it are still going strong. We have not used it for piecing.

    Darren

  8. #8
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    I've used my serger thread for everything with no issues. It works great for you embroidery machine, I use it to create a shadow effect on my embroidery as most of the embroidery thread is shiny and the serger thread is matte. Try a sample, I think you'll like it.

  9. #9
    Super Member wolph33's Avatar
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    I have used maxi lock for piecing for more years than I want to admit to,lol-guess I am getting old
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/Upnorthcrafter

  10. #10
    Super Member sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    If you are talking about "Maxilock", it is not a thread that was made to hold up to seaming or quilting. It was designed to be a cheap and light thread for finishing the cut edges of garments, to keep them from raveling. It sounds like people have gotten away with using it on their quilts, but if you want your quilts to last a lifetime, I wouldn't use it. I made all my kid's clothes when they were small, using a serger and knit fabrics as much as possible (faster, easier). It was then that I learned the serged seams with Maxilock do not hold up. The thread will break easily in any kind of stretchy seam under stress. I know quilt seams are not stretchy, but a thread salesman confirmed my findings that Maxilock is a lightweight thread. I would use at least a Tex 40 rated thread for quilts. Maxilock is only a Tex 27.

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