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Thread: A very easy way to make ruffles.....

  1. #31
    Super Member grann of 6's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stitchnripper View Post
    The way I have used recently is to zig zag over a thick piece of thread (some recommend dental floss) without catching it and then gather to desired length and when done sewing, pull out the thick thread/floss.

    As an apparel sewer for over 60 years, this is what I did. I used buttonhole thread. After you pulled out the thread, you could even use it over again. I guess new quilters don't realize how many ideas from apparel sewing can be used on quilting. I also love the narrow hem produced by the serger.

  2. #32
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    Try using the differential feed on your serger - easy.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by NanaCsews2 View Post
    One way to gather is to have a long bobbin thread when starting. Needs to be the same length or longer as the fabric length you are ruffling. Bring that bobbin thread up over the top of the fabric and lay it the length of the fabric toward the direction you are sewing. Put down the presser foot. Using a loose zig zag stitch (adjust your stitch length-I use a 2) and a width of 4-6, sew over the bobbin thread. Leave a long bobbin thread tail at the end. Pull the bobbin thread and gather up the fabric. Done!
    This is the way I saw on youtube and just love this method. A variant of this is to take a piece of dental floss the lenght of the fabric and zig zag over this, then stay stitch below the ruffle and remove the floss.

  4. #34
    Super Member catmcclure's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kellen46 View Post
    I saw this method demonstrated on YouTube, sorry to say I lost the link. However it is so simple and effective I thought to pass it on. Here it is, set your tension to #8 and stitch length to #5. If you cannot do either of these things then this won't work for you. However once things are set just sew along the edge. Do not back stitch and be sure to leave at least 4inch thread tales on either end. The gathers are easily then adjusted as needed.
    Making theatrical costumes, I found the easiest way to gather a skirt or a ruffle was with crochet cotton. Lay the crochet thread on top of your fabric and zig-zag over it - don't use a tight stitch, about a 3 length instead of 2.5 is okay. When you've finished the length of the fabric, just pull on the crochet thread. It's the quickest and easiest way to gather a large amount of fabric (I made a lot of nylon-net petticoats for a production of Grease once) in the shortest time.

    If you want, you can zig-zag two pieces of crochet thread on the fabric to give you a wider "flat" area to work with along the gathered edge.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by irishrose View Post
    I second the two rows of stitching. I have done this nearly 60 years. I've even used three rows on very full garments. I would never use a single row on anything.
    I agree with irishrose. I still remember my hom-ec teacher teaching us to use 3 rows of basting stitches for gathering. With this method there are no unwanted little tucks from the fabric below the gathering threads slipping into the gather. I've used my ruffler for some garments, but never quite as happy with the results. I'm sewing for two little granddaughters now and I'll only use the old method for their clothes. I'm not at 60 years of sewing experience, but getting closer every day! (42 years of experience)

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by kellen46 View Post
    I saw this method demonstrated on YouTube, sorry to say I lost the link. However it is so simple and effective I thought to pass it on. Here it is, set your tension to #8 and stitch length to #5. If you cannot do either of these things then this won't work for you. However once things are set just sew along the edge. Do not back stitch and be sure to leave at least 4inch thread tales on either end. The gathers are easily then adjusted as needed. I recently needed to add ruffles to a curved hem on aprons, this worked great. I just pinned at the center and ends of the seam and adjusted the ruffles as I pinned along the perimeter. Of course this is basically a basting stitch so you do need to over sew the gathers with a regular stitch length and tension. I have a ruffling-foot and a gathering foot but I found this a very easy solution to how to get the gathers to fit in the seam you are trying to match it with. If anyone has a link to the You Tube video on the gathering technique please post it so they can get credit for this idea.
    Another tip I found helpful is if you have a serger and can do a rolled hem stitch, then I just finish the bottom edge rather than hem it. I use all four threads, widest seam width setting and a short stitch setting. Then I get out some bright variegated serger threads and finish off the bottom edge this way. It adds a pop of color, and gives the edge a clean hemmed finish. It adds a decorative edge to the ruffle. It is also a great and easy way to do a quick finish to kitchen towels and wash cloths.
    Thanks Kellen46 for bringing that up. I've been away from clothing construction so long, I kind of forgot about all those neat techniques. I had two daughters & oh did I enjoy making all those gathered skirts & ruffles. I also did mine with 2 & 3 rows of stitching. Christmas always meant a new red velvet dress with lots of ruffled lace.

  7. #37
    Super Member SherriB's Avatar
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    I will have to try to change the tension next time I need ruffles. I was taught to do the double rows of basting way back in jr. high. I also have done the zig-zag over thick thread also. I hate to ruffle and any way to do it easier, I am all for it!!
    Sherri

  8. #38
    Senior Member kellen46's Avatar
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    Additional information on this simple way to make ruffles.

    I guess the point of this I did not make clear is that this method does not just lay down a basting thread but actally makes the gathers as well. The higher the tension setting the tighter the gathers. An 8 setting is a denser gather than a 7 or a 6. The advantage is that if your ruffle is a bit short or long you can easily adjust with out much effort. Unlike just laying a down a basting line you do not have to do a lot of pulling on threads. Just try it and you might become a convert to this method. I wish I still had the link to the video as she does such a clear job of explaining and it is so easy her daughter does the demonstration.
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