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Thread: Warm & White batting question

  1. #1
    Senior Member Helovesme's Avatar
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    Warm & White batting question

    There is a distinct difference in the two sides of the Warm & White batting and I've always put my quilt top on the side that has the "dimples" on it and quilted away. Is this correct or does it matter? Does it make a difference in the quilting? In researching the product, the side that has the "dimples" on it is actually the side with the scrim, which is what holds the batting together so-to-speak. So, I've been quilting on the scrim side.

    The reason for my question is I am wanting to put 2 layers of this batting in a baby quilt and was wondering if it matters how I sandwich these layers together. If there is a "correct" way, I certainly don't want to take any of the warmth away by putting the wrong side on the top. I hope this makes sense. I remember a post on the board a long time ago about this, so my apologies for bringing it up again.

  2. #2
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Ideally scrim is placed next to the backing fabric. This batting is needlepunched through scrim and, by positioning it this way, you are quilting in the same direction as the batting was needlepunched. I don't believe changing warmth is involved. Rather, you don't want batting to "beard"; placing the scrim next to the backing fabric should theoretically reduce any chance of bearding.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Helovesme's Avatar
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    I appreciate you taking the time to respond. Well it appears I have been doing it wrong and now I know. I will start putting my quilt tops on the "other" side. Thanks for clarifying this for me.

  4. #4
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    The Warm Co claims that their W&W doesn't beard, so if you're using a backing with a decently tight weave and a good needle you shouldn't have any problems either way. I agree with Prism that the warmth won't be affected. I would probably place the scrim down on both batts, since traditionally the scrim side should go against the backing.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Helovesme's Avatar
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    Thanks dunster, I will sandwich with the scrim down on both batts. Thanks ladies for your help!

  6. #6
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    You've been doing it right, no need to change. The scrim side of both W&N and W&W is the flat side, not the bumpy side.

    Look at W&N, the dirty side, the one with the flecks, is the non-scrim (top) side. That's also the side with the bumps. The scrim (bottom) side is whiter and flatter. The Warm Company confirms this on their FQ page. http://www.warmcompany.com/faq.html

    The same holds true for W&W except there are no flecks to make it easier to see the difference. The flat side is a bit whiter, even with W&W.

    Bottom line, the flat side is the scrim side. Reminder hint to get it right every time: 'Bump it up'.

    Is there a reason you want two layers of batting for your baby quilt? Won't that make it rather stiff and heavy?
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  7. #7
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    Well, I learned something here! I've never paid attention to which side of my batting is up or down! I just sandwich and quilt. But I've never had an issue with W&N (or white) ever bearding.

  8. #8
    Super Member brushandthimble's Avatar
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    I did have a customer quilt "beard" until I turned the batting over (WNW). Could have been her backing fabric, but I have paid attention since to which side I put up.
    After 2 years with the same signature I have been requested to remove it. Bye

  9. #9
    Super Member carolaug's Avatar
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    LOL..I never knew there was a right and wrong side...thank-you for posting this.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Helovesme's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghostrider View Post
    You've been doing it right, no need to change. The scrim side of both W&N and W&W is the flat side, not the bumpy side.

    Look at W&N, the dirty side, the one with the flecks, is the non-scrim (top) side. That's also the side with the bumps. The scrim (bottom) side is whiter and flatter. The Warm Company confirms this on their FQ page. http://www.warmcompany.com/faq.html

    The same holds true for W&W except there are no flecks to make it easier to see the difference. The flat side is a bit whiter, even with W&W.

    Bottom line, the flat side is the scrim side. Reminder hint to get it right every time: 'Bump it up'.

    Is there a reason you want two layers of batting for your baby quilt? Won't that make it rather stiff and heavy?
    A baby quilt going to Colorado. I used some thinner cotton fabrics when I probably should've used flannel. But I thought 2 layers of batting would make it extra toasty warm. But now that you mention it, it may get stiff and heavy. I didn't plan on doing alot of quilting on it...maybe that would help it not be so stiff?

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