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Thread: Wavy Border after Applying Binding

  1. #1
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    Wavy Border after Applying Binding

    I just squared up my quilt and applied binding. Everything was laying flat before binding and now after binding, the edges are slightly wavy. Is there anything I can do to correct this? It is queen sized and hand quilted with a finished 6 inch border.

  2. #2
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    I'm wondering if the binding was pulled while it was being sewn on. This happened to me once, I ended up completely re-doing the binding.

  3. #3
    Super Member Mad Mimm's Avatar
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    I had that problem too with my early bindings - I was using too tight a grip on the fabric and it was being stretched as I was holding it to sew into place. Once I started relaxing my hands and using a softer hold on the quilt, it got better.
    Sheila N.

    When Thomas Edison invented the light bulb, he tried over 2000 experiments before he got it to work. A young reporter asked him how it felt to fail so many times. He said, "I never failed once. I invented the light bulb. It just happened to be a 2000 step process."

  4. #4
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    It would seem like you stretched the binding as you were applying it. This is not that uncommon , particulary if you were using a binding that was cut from the width of the fabric, as there is more stretch on the cross grain.

  5. #5
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Did you put the binding on with a walking foot? That can really help.

  6. #6
    Super Member 117becca's Avatar
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    i will still pin the binding in a couple places along each side to keep from stretching the binding.
    my name is becca and i'm a quilt-a-holic :-)

  7. #7
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    ITA with the others that it may be the binding and the way it was applied.

    You did say "slightly" wavy ... that's hard for us to know "how" wavy it has become.
    There is a possibility that you might be able to block it into submission .... spritz with water and press gently with the iron.
    However, it may not remove the problem ... and resurface after washing.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Sew many ideas ... just sew little time!!
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  8. #8
    Senior Member Sally J's Avatar
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    Using a walking foot will really help. Don't pull to much on the binding, like the other said that may be what's happening. I always use cross grain and have never had a problem. I always hand sew the binding on the back, I tried machine stitching once and it just didn't look good and was harder to keep it from waving. Like FMQ, practice is key. Make some sample small sandwiches to practice everything including getting the corners right. Good luck

  9. #9
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    Things that help prevent this are: (1) heavily starching the binding fabric before cutting strips, (2) cutting binding strips on the straight-grain instead of the cross-grain or bias, (3) placing binding on top while sewing, (4) using a walking foot.

    I also do something most quilters don't. When I square up, I mark the square with a permanent Sharpie pen instead of cutting. I use the line as my "virtual" edge when sewing on binding, and cut the quilt only after I have sewed the binding on. (Be *very* careful when cutting the corners, as you do not want to cut any of the binding that is there.) In my experience, this helps stabilize the quilt edge while attaching binding.

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