Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Wavy wavy wavy binding help

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    54
    Good Morning, I have been registered for some time, and have enjoyed everyone's comments,hints, instructions etc. I have only made one quilt which I am ashamed to say I finished in a "quillow" fashion. I have made my DIL a wallhanging for Christmas, everything went great until the binding - oh my gosh, it has the dreaded wave. If somebody could please direct me on how to fix this I would be so very appreciative, my DIL probably more than me, since hanging such an unattractive item would be something she would do, because of she would never want to offend. Please any help would be so welcome.

  2. #2
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Out searching for some sunshine :-)
    Posts
    59,108
    Blog Entries
    1
    The first thing is to unsew all of your binding :(

    I am not sure what caused that, but I don't think there is any way of correcting it without taking it apart.

    I am sure some of the other members can help with that question...
    Were your quilt edges laying flat when you started sewing the binding on?

  3. #3
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    9,821
    Blog Entries
    1
    So the problem binding was made separately? (Not quillow fashion?)

    Binding is more likely to ripple if it is cut on the bias. Most of us cut binding on the straight-of-grain. Bias binding is better for quilts that will get heavy usage (edge will hold up longer), but is not necessary for wallhangings or regular-use quilts.

    You will probably need to remove the binding to get it right.

    The biggest tip I can give you is to heavily starch the binding before you sew it onto the quilt. Actually, I heavily starch the fabric before cutting the binding! Starch stabilizes the binding so it won't stretch out of shape.

    The other "biggest tip" I can give you is to use a walking foot to attach your binding.

    Also, did you pin your binding in place before sewing? You really need to do this to make sure you are not stretching the binding out of shape as you sew. This applies to adding borders also.

    I find it more difficult to sew a binding to an already-cut quilt edge, so instead I mark the quilt edge with a permanent Sharpie and pretend it is the cut edge as I sew on the binding. I don't actually cut on that line until after I have sewn the binding onto the front and need to roll the binding over to the back.

    Here is a Youtube video of how one quilter handles binding:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4PE0Yq9iGlc (3 parts to it)

    and here is another video of how one quilter attaches binding completely by machine:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wprg5vzkuGw (2 parts)

    I think you will find them both very helpful!

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    54
    I think maybe I messed up when I measured, probably not too sharp at this. I think the center of the wallhanging is smaller that the outer border - grrrrrrrrr. Of all the stupid things I could do this probably takes the biscuit. Will start unpicking, and try again, this time with a wider binding. Will just keep saying "I think I can" and dive in.

  5. #5
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Out searching for some sunshine :-)
    Posts
    59,108
    Blog Entries
    1
    We have all made mistakes on our quilts, whether it is the first or hundredth, they happen :wink:

  6. #6
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    3,549
    Quote Originally Posted by margaret light
    I think maybe I messed up when I measured, probably not too sharp at this. I think the center of the wallhanging is smaller that the outer border - grrrrrrrrr. Of all the stupid things I could do this probably takes the biscuit. Will start unpicking, and try again, this time with a wider binding. Will just keep saying "I think I can" and dive in.
    That's easy to do. Always measure the center of the block sideways and up and down. Doesn't matter whether it is just one block or a whole quilt. It's too easy to stretch the edges and get a wrong measurement.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    54
    Thank you ladies, I will now sit peacefully and remove the binding. Will carefully apply the new and let you know what happens. Thank you again.

  8. #8
    Super Member twistedstitcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    1,025
    One thing I've done if the wave isn't too bad is to take a long basting stitch in the ditch where the binding is sewn to the quilt and then gently pull it like you would if you were gathering fabric. Once you get the quilt to lie flat, stitch in the ditch to keep the gathering secure. Just be careful not to gather too much or you'll have puckers on the quilt.

  9. #9
    Super Member Barb_MO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    2,117
    Sometimes when the border or outside edges are not quilted as much as the center, it will wave on the edges.
    I don't usually pin the binding on, so I've had trouble with binding on some quilts because I tend to pull the binding more than the quilt.

  10. #10
    Super Member Darlene's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    1,905
    I just recently had to remove a completed binding and do it all over. Doing this teaches patience. LOL

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.