Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: What is best for fabric/quilt storage

  1. #1
    Super Member solstice3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    West Central Florida
    Posts
    8,681

    What is best for fabric/quilt storage

    A friend recently told me that she was told not to store quilts and fabric in plastic as the plastic causes the fabric to deterriorate faster. She was told to keep her quilt stored in fabric bag. When told plastic, would that include storage bins or just the plastic zipper bags that you get blankets inat stores? What is best?

  2. #2
    Super Member karenpatrick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Rosedale, Indiana
    Posts
    1,993
    I've always heard that old clean pillow cases are great to store quilts. You should also take them out periodicly and refold them to keet them from getting fold marks in them.

  3. #3
    Senior Member BeckyB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Camas, Wa
    Posts
    458
    Blog Entries
    1
    I too have heard to store them in a pillow case.
    It is easier to be wise for others than for ourselves.

  4. #4
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    9,672
    Blog Entries
    1
    Fabric allows the quilt to breathe, which means that moisture is not trapped inside. (Trapped moisture can cause mold and other fiber deterioration.)

    However, it's really the soft plastics that are not so good for quilt storage as they can outgas chemicals that damage fibers. Another problem with garbage bags specifically is that quilts have inadvertently been mistaken for garbage and gotten tossed.

    Hard plastic containers are safe except for the moisture trapping issue. To deal with that, some people drill a couple of holes in the container but it's easier to just include some silica gel packets similar to those found in pill bottles, shoes, etc. You can even buy silica gel in bulk at places such as Walmart; it is used to dry flowers.

    Edit: I just want to add that if there is any possibility of mice getting into the house, the hard plastic container with silica gel would be the safest. Mice will chew quilts and use fibers for bedding. In this case, you also wouldn't want to drill holes in the plastic bins as mice can squeeze through incredibly small places.

  5. #5
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    howell, Mi
    Posts
    1,862
    Prism 99 has some good pointers, I just wanted to add that almost everyone has the chance of having mice. They come inside to get out of the weather, so especially in areas that have cold winters mice are a fact of life. You are so right, they can get inside through the smallest opening, and then they send out signals so all their friends can come too.
    Sue

  6. #6
    Super Member PaperPrincess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    6,330
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by susie-susie-susie View Post
    Prism 99 has some good pointers, I just wanted to add that almost everyone has the chance of having mice. They come inside to get out of the weather, so especially in areas that have cold winters mice are a fact of life. You are so right, they can get inside through the smallest opening, and then they send out signals so all their friends can come too.
    Sue
    And you forgot to mention that they are all females and are all PG. ;-)
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  7. #7
    Super Member Gladys's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    3,647
    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    Fabric allows the quilt to breathe, which means that moisture is not trapped inside. (Trapped moisture can cause mold and other fiber deterioration.)

    However, it's really the soft plastics that are not so good for quilt storage as they can outgas chemicals that damage fibers. Another problem with garbage bags specifically is that quilts have inadvertently been mistaken for garbage and gotten tossed.

    Hard plastic containers are safe except for the moisture trapping issue. To deal with that, some people drill a couple of holes in the container but it's easier to just include some silica gel packets similar to those found in pill bottles, shoes, etc. You can even buy silica gel in bulk at places such as Walmart; it is used to dry flowers.

    Edit: I just want to add that if there is any possibility of mice getting into the house, the hard plastic container with silica gel would be the safest. Mice will chew quilts and use fibers for bedding. In this case, you also wouldn't want to drill holes in the plastic bins as mice can squeeze through incredibly small places.
    Great advice and I didn't know Wal Mart sold silica gel. I have seen the small packets sold in Michaels.

  8. #8
    Super Member Gladys's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    3,647
    Quote Originally Posted by PaperPrincess View Post
    And you forgot to mention that they are all females and are all PG. ;-)
    LOL Isn't that the truth!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.