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Thread: What the heck do I do with the tails?

  1. #11
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Dingle, how do you manage to make mitered corners on your bindings without sewing in reverse? If you can do that, you can backstitch.

  2. #12
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    Nex time start with a very very short stitch for the first few stitches and end the same way, then you can cut the threads. One thing to be very sure of is not cut the quilt when snipping the threads. It happens more often then you think and usually to me. :lol:

  3. #13
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    I backstitch and cut the threads. Never had anything unravel. If possible, I run the stitch off the edge and capture it with the binding.

  4. #14
    Super Member quilt addict's Avatar
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    Love those walking feet! I start and pull my bobbin thread to the top. Then set my stitch length to zero, stitch a couple of times and then change to the stitch length I want to sew and proceed. That should lock you threads and you can clip them.

    I have snipped my top toooo. :(

  5. #15
    Senior Member Shelley's Avatar
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    For those of you who like to bury the tails, take a look at this needle:

    http://www.spiraleyeneedles.com/

    I have purchased them, and I love them! They are easier on your fingers. I know they are expensive, so I am pretty protective, I'm still using my first one and I've had it close to a year. I made a small pin cushion using a pop cap, and that sits on the handlebars of my longarm. They are easy to thread. I also used the needle to snag a red thread that was showing through white fabric: I slipped the needle in just under the thread, and caught it in the hook.

    Since they are so unusual, I also bought extras, for secret stitcher exchanges.

  6. #16
    Jerrie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dingle
    I just finished putting my quilt together. I used a walking foot to SITD. I started in the middle of the quilt like someone told me to do. Now what do I do with all that thread hanging from the quilt? I know I just can't cut them off because then it will come undone. Tried to do a search but couldn't find anything that addressed this.

    Thanks

    BTW- A walking foot is just the bomb :D
    cut them and when you do the binding it will catch then that is what i do an i have not had any problem

  7. #17
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    To avoid this problem, I start in the middle of an edge (say, the middle of the top edge) and sew all the way to the other edge. The second line of sewing is from the middle of a side edge all the way across to the other side edge. When using a walking foot and quilting straight lines, I don't think I would ever start every line smack dab in the middle of the quilt. Hiding all those thread ends would drive me crazy!

  8. #18
    Senior Member Dingle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    To avoid this problem, I start in the middle of an edge (say, the middle of the top edge) and sew all the way to the other edge. The second line of sewing is from the middle of a side edge all the way across to the other side edge. When using a walking foot and quilting straight lines, I don't think I would ever start every line smack dab in the middle of the quilt. Hiding all those thread ends would drive me crazy!
    Being a newbie and reading this board other posters said to start in the middle and work your way out to the edge. This is suppose to help with the shifting of the sandwich. Does doing it your way not really make a difference?

    Thanks

  9. #19
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dingle
    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    To avoid this problem, I start in the middle of an edge (say, the middle of the top edge) and sew all the way to the other edge. The second line of sewing is from the middle of a side edge all the way across to the other side edge. When using a walking foot and quilting straight lines, I don't think I would ever start every line smack dab in the middle of the quilt. Hiding all those thread ends would drive me crazy!
    Being a newbie and reading this board other posters said to start in the middle and work your way out to the edge. This is suppose to help with the shifting of the sandwich. Does doing it your way not really make a difference?

    Thanks
    I mentioned this technique in the original thread here (no pun intended!).

    Of course, it is always desirable to start quilting in the middle so any excess fabric is pushed to the edge. However, when quilting straight lines that go from one edge to another, it shouldn't matter as long as (1) you have a stable quilt sandwich (2) that your machine feeds evenly.

    In my case, I use cotton batting, spray baste with a few pins around the outside edges, and I use a Bernina walking foot with my Bernina machine. This combination feeds very evenly for me.

    This method of quilting using a walking foot from one side of the quilt to the other has been around for at least 20 years; I remember reading in Quilter's Newsletter Magazine about the man who pioneered it when machine quilting was still very new. The key is to have a stable quilt sandwich and a walking foot that really does feed the fabric evenly.

  10. #20
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    I like those much better than the ones I have, the eye is split at the top and if you have to pull very hard to get it through the fabric the thread pulls back out, I think I'll try these.

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