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Thread: What is a Stillito (can't spell it)

  1. #1
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    What is a Stillito (can't spell it)

    What is a stilleto and how is it used? I know I spelled it wrong, but hope you know what I mean.

  2. #2
    Senior Member cdmmiracles's Avatar
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    It's a very sharp pointed tool. Some people use them for help guiding small pieces of fabric through the sewing maching; sometimes for pushing corners out; sometimes for picking out stitches too tight to get the seam ripper under. Looks sort of like an ice pick! Hope this helps

  3. #3
    Senior Member Weezy Rider's Avatar
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    Some have a double pronged end. I have one that has one flat and one pointed end set up like a fork.
    You can use it to hold down small pieces when pressing to avoid burning your fingers.

    There is also a pointed needle that fits over your finger called a trolley needle. Used to be used for heirloom sewing before the new machines embroidered a lot of the fancies. I found one at a quilt show. The lady was doing a demo of turn needle applique. Quite an interesting technique.

  4. #4
    Senior Member GingerK's Avatar
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    I use my stiletto to help guide fabric under my sewing needle, especially when I have a longish piece and need to ease in a little fullness. And as already stated, it is great for helping those tiny pieces under the needle. Hmmm will have to try it at the ironing board too. Thanks for that tip Weezy Rider.
    Never argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down the their level and beat you with experience.

  5. #5
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    It looks like a very pointed chop stick. A lady in my quilting group uses porcupine quills as one. She bought them for $1 at a outdoor festival. Strange but true!
    "In the crazy quilt of life, I'm glad you are in my block of friends."

  6. #6
    Super Member carslo's Avatar
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    I used a bamboo skewer broken in half for my stiletto, works fine and cheap to buy. I received a Purple Thingy at the guild and I use it also but my default is the broken in half bamboo skewer. Check the klitchen you might already have a stiletto in there
    A bed without a quilt is like the night sky without stars.

    http://californiaquilting.blogspot.com/

  7. #7
    Super Member valleyquiltermo's Avatar
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    I use my Grannys old ice pick it has a nice tear drop handle the bigger part being the place to hold it and the smaller end attached to the pick I love it as it is easier on my hand to hold it.
    http://www.skillpages.com/DonnaValleyquiltermo
    Sweet Dreams come from under Cozy Quilts made with love.
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  8. #8
    Senior Member humbird's Avatar
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    I use the nut pick that came with the nut cracker set. Chop stick and seam ripper works very well also. Lots of "pointy" things will work.

  9. #9
    Super Member PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    You can use almost anything with a pointed tip. I found the ones that are slightly blunted work best for me., my favorite has a point like a tapestry needle. I cannot piece without this tool in my hand! Really helps to keep the trailing edges together all the way up to the foot. Your fingers are too big, and they shouldn't be that close to the needle anyway!
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

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    I use my seam ripper in a pinch, but I have also broken several in the process. I like to buy the cheap ones and they break pretty easy. I always buy several at a time so I always have one near-by.
    Sue

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