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Thread: What would you charge?

  1. #1
    Senior Member mary705's Avatar
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    What would you charge?

    A co-worker of my DD would like me to make a quilt from her recently deceased mother's clothing. She will provide everything needed - clothing, batting, backing and thread. She doesn't want anything fancy. Any suggestion on what to charge for something like this? She would like to have it completed by Christmas.

    Thanks for your help.

    Mary

  2. #2
    Super Member
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    Does she just want squares put together or something like a 9 patch with sashing? I just did this for a friend from her fathers shirts. I had to put interfacing behind each one, some were so thin ( used something specific for silk fabric it was very light and didn't add much bulk.). She picked out a quilt pattern she liked and I was comfortable making. I'm thinking of asking $250 + the quilting on my longarm. Only you can know if you can get it done by Christmas. I felt better about having her pick out the pattern so I knew she would be flappy with it. I would want to see the fabrics first. If they are slippery polyester blouse fabrics they will be more time consuming to handle.
    Cheryl Robinson
    http://www.silverneedlestitching.com
    APQS Millenium Longarm with Intelliquilter

  3. #3
    Super Member hperttula123's Avatar
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    until you see what type of fabric she plans on having in it, you really don't know what your getting into. Certain fabrics will need stabilizer on the back and that is alot more work you have to put into it. Go on etsy and do a search for tshirt quilts. You will be able to see what quilts like that are going for.
    enjoy your life...it's the only one you have!!!
    Heather

  4. #4
    Power Poster
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    You couldn't pay me enough to tackle a quilt like that. I have done it for a favor and just charged for materials needed to do it. As someone mentioned it depends on what kind of clothing she brings. Cotton house dresses are easy enough to make into a top. Knits, jerseys, cordory,denim etc. are tougher to work with and combine.

  5. #5
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    I would be wary of working on a project like that with a deadline of Christmas. That's a lot of pressure!

  6. #6
    Super Member 117becca's Avatar
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    I do this stuff because the money feeds my habit - I enjoy working on a project as much as the person appreciates me doing it. I may start out the conversation with "My quilt group gets $300(or whatever) or more to do this" and pay attention to their face. Then negotiate from there. I know that i never "make" any money, but consider the pay a token of my kindness.

    I did finish a quilt for a woman - gave her a choice - a variety of things that I could do w/ a range of prices and then let her chose. It took some of the "hardness" out of creating a price, too. It came down to what I'd really like to get paid and how I'd do it, down to still meeting her needs and a cost that I thought she could probably afford.
    Last edited by 117becca; 10-24-2012 at 01:31 AM.
    my name is becca and i'm a quilt-a-holic :-)

  7. #7
    Senior Member mary705's Avatar
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    Those are all great suggestions everyone, thanks. I'm working on a t-shirt quilt for my nephew on and off right now, so I do know about the stabilizer on the back. I will check etsy to see what the going price is on there too.

  8. #8
    Super Member Sandygirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    I would be wary of working on a project like that with a deadline of Christmas. That's a lot of pressure!
    Christmas 2013 "maybe". We are staring at the calendar and November is looming large! No way would i put the pressure on my plate. I would have to charge a premium to do so.

    Sandy
    Sandygirl

    Janome 9900 / Janome 9700 / Janome Decor 3050 / Janome 1100D serger
    Singer Centennial model (inherited from my late, fav aunt!)

  9. #9
    Super Member feline fanatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    You couldn't pay me enough to tackle a quilt like that. I have done it for a favor and just charged for materials needed to do it. As someone mentioned it depends on what kind of clothing she brings. Cotton house dresses are easy enough to make into a top. Knits, jerseys, cordory,denim etc. are tougher to work with and combine.

    I could not agree more. I did it once (well actually twice as the client had me make two, one for her and one for her sister). I cussed myself up, down and sideways while making it and swore I would never ever do it again. While I made a couple hundred for each quilt the aggravation wasn't worth it working with all those different weights and types of fabrics. Plus I was looking at fabric I didn't love, which I have discovered is an integral part of the enjoyment of the quilting process for me. I will do T-shirt quilts for hire but I will not make another memory quilt from clothing of deceased loved ones ever again. No amount of money is worth it to me.

  10. #10
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    1. The deadline is way short, too much pressure on you. See if you can negotiate this with her by including pictures of the fabrics and the design in a gift envelop so that the recipient can see what she'll be getting a couple months later rather than on Christmas Day.
    2. You will likely have to purchase interfacing/stabilizer/something fusible for use on some of the fabrics, allow for the cost of this yardage in what you charge. This stuff ranges from $.99 to $5.29 at JoAnns.
    3. As these will be used clothing, you may have to wash, dry and iron the fabrics before you can even start to cut and assemble. Allow for this labor.
    4. Always include a thread charge, even if it is the cost of just one spool. In your case, a cotton wrapped polyester will likely be the best for mixed fabrics, just like general, all-purpose sewing.
    5. Will the quilt be washed again after making it? Allow for that time and energy use.
    6. Will you have to set aside other things you were planning to do for the holidays to take on this project? Consider that in your fee.
    7. Will you have to drive to deliver it to her or will she come to you to pick it up? Gas fee.

    I know I seem to be nickle and dime-ing this to death, but my point is to show that we often do not realize that there is MUCH more going into our "offer to help" than what we do at the cutting and sewing table. If you are being paid "just for your time", then consider ALL of your time put into the project.

    Jan in VA
    Jan in VA
    Living in the foothills
    peacefully colors my world.

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