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Thread: Wheel of Mystery....Winding Ways...Quilt Pattern....Help Please !!!!!!!!!

  1. #1
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
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    Wheel of Mystery....Winding Ways...Quilt Pattern....Help Please !!!!!!!!!

    Ok here I go again.....was given all the precut pieces for this quilt to finish for Prayers and Squares by my local Quilting Buddy. Of course no directions came with the box......There are a lot of curved pieces in this pattern...had to figure out what order to sew the pieces in.....and now am having a serious problem with everything matching in the middle.....

    If you have done this pattern....what are some of the tricks you can share with me...

    I have sewn for a long time, pieced and quilted for years.....it is just a little difficult with no instructions, I did some goggling over the weekend didn't really learn anything new.


    Yes that is a real picture of my hometown Temecula, California. We feature premiere Wineries, World Class Golf Courses, Pechanga Indian Casino and Hot Air Balloons

  2. #2
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    Yikes! Could you add sashing so that matching becomes a non-issue?

  3. #3
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    Yikes! Could you add sashing so that matching becomes a non-issue?
    It is the center of the blocks I have like 8 pieces coming together to meet.....
    Yes that is a real picture of my hometown Temecula, California. We feature premiere Wineries, World Class Golf Courses, Pechanga Indian Casino and Hot Air Balloons

  4. #4
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
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    If you sew the curved seams consistently then the centers of the blocks will meet.

    I know this is long, but here is how to sew curved seams:
    Sewing Curved Seams

    This is applicable especially for Drunkard’s Path and Wheel of Mystery quilts, but can be adapted to other curved seam piecing.

    First off: there is an “Innie” and an Outtie” curve piece, or if you prefer a “crust” and a “pie wedge.”

    Do Not cut into the pieces at all. Keep the edges rounded as per the templates.

    Take each piece finger press so that you halve each curve with a finger pressing. Then match the finger pressed centerfold lines and pin these together. Pin so that the curves are evenly divided. I prefer my pins to be opposite of what many quilters use: the point of the pin goes toward the edge of the fabric so I can remove it with my left hand. Sometimes I pin but keep the point of the pin just shy of the actual sewing line but so those finger pressed folds are together.

    Keep consistent when sewing the two curves together. I like to sew with a relaxed bottom, or the innie/crust side on the bottom. It sounds funny and is easier for me to remember. Sew with RST and a ” seam allowance.

    Some people pin the start of the sewing so that the ends are aligned. I don’t. After you get used to doing this you may find you don’t need to pin this anymore as you can easily hold the starting ends together accurately. If you have it, use the needle down function on your machine as it is easier to sew that way. [I have a Pfaff and disengage the IDT for this sewing as I will be manipulating the fabric.] There is no need to use any ‘special” foot other than a ” flange guide foot. If your machine doesn’t have one, then any seam guide that allows a ” seam will do. Otherwise just keep close watch on your foot so that you sew the consistent seam. Keep one finger between the layers of fabric so it is easier to align the edges as you sew. At first you will probably only take 3-6 stitches at a time. Gradually you may increase this if you are comfortable doing so. Check to make sure there aren’t any folds or wrinkles in the bottom piece of fabric. When you reach the pin at the half way point, remove the pin, place your finger again between the two layers, and use long handled slant pointed tweezers to hold the ends of the fabrics together. Using these tweezers you can hold the ends together til you finish your sewing. Some people prefer to pin at the ends and that is OK too. Remember no sewing over pins.

    Keeping a finger between the fabrics and aligning the center points are the 2 main key factors of doing this type of curved piecing.

    I have done it with the innie/crust on bottom and with it on top. Either way works well. To me this is a personal preference. Just be consistent within the project you are making.

    It is easier if you chain piece your curves as you will develop a rhythm to your sewing and find it very relaxing this way. You may also find you can feel that you are keeping the fabric free of folds with that finger between the fabrics.

    Some people prefer to iron the seams to the innie/crust. Others prefer the opposite. Look at your work and you decide which look you want. It is your quilt.

    ali
    Have fun quilting! If it isn't fun, you will miss a lot.
    ali

  5. #5
    Super Member PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    I've made several winding way's quilts. Here's one that I posted.
    Winding Ways, Healing Ways
    Here's the technique I use:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WjCJYGm8TWs
    but I pin the trailing edge of the piece first instead of using tweezers. the winding ways curve is much gentler than the drunkard's path so it's actually easier to sew.
    There are 12 pieces in each block:
    4 innie petals, 4 outie petals and 4 thongs (sorry, they just look like thong panties to me)
    The construction sequence I use is:
    1) Join 2 thong pieces at the narrow end. Use a really small stitch length. Press this seam open. now you have 2 single thong pieces and a joined piece.
    2) make the 4 petals using the curved piecing method above, using a regular seam length. Press the seams one way or the other, but be consistent on all the pieces. There should be no need to clip the seams.
    3) Sew 2 completed petals to a single thong. do this twice to make the 2 sides. press seams toward the petals.
    4) Now you should be able to sew the 2 sides to the thong piece you made in the first step. Press these seams toward the thong.
    I found this block very easy to make, however, mine were die cut, so they were very consistent. As posted before, you need to be very careful about keeping a consistent seam allowance.
    Let me know if you have more questions, or if this is not clear.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  6. #6
    Super Member virtualbernie's Avatar
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    There are 12 pieces in each block:
    4 innie petals, 4 outie petals and 4 thongs (sorry, they just look like thong panties to me)
    The construction sequence I use is:
    1) Join 2 thong pieces at the narrow end. Use a really small stitch length. Press this seam open. now you have 2 single thong pieces and a joined piece.
    2) make the 4 petals using the curved piecing method above, using a regular seam length. Press the seams one way or the other, but be consistent on all the pieces. There should be no need to clip the seams.
    3) Sew 2 completed petals to a single thong. do this twice to make the 2 sides. press seams toward the petals.
    4) Now you should be able to sew the 2 sides to the thong piece you made in the first step. Press these seams toward the thong.
    I found this block very easy to make, however, mine were die cut, so they were very consistent. As posted before, you need to be very careful about keeping a consistent seam allowance.
    Let me know if you have more questions, or if this is not clear.[/QUOTE]

    That's the way I do mine also--got these instructions with my Marti Michell templates. Easy as pie! I had another set of Winding Ways templates--not Marti's and I had a heck of a time piecing them.

    BTW: I love love love your description--"thongs" Think I'll use it from now on!
    Bernie

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