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Thread: When/How to Use Retayne and/or Synthrapol

  1. #1
    Power Poster
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    http://www.prochemicalanddye.com/store/home.php?cat=323

    The directions for both say to use HOT water (140 degrees F., 60 degrees C)

    The instructions for Retayne suggest treating the fabric BEFORE cutting it.

    Retayne - soak fabrics for 20 minutes in hot water, then rinse

    Synthrapol - soak 10-12 minutes in hot water, then rinse.

    As far as I can tell from that info, they are NOT interchangeable.

  2. #2
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
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    retayne helps set the dyes

    synthrapol keeps fugitive dyes from getting on other fabrics in the water.

    2 DIFFERENT ANIMALS

  3. #3
    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
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    I love synthrapol. I always put a cap in when I wash my completed quilts. I haven't had a disaster yet. No, I don't pre wash, and I dye fabric and clothing quite often.

  4. #4
    LDB
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    Becky at my LQS (Sunshine Stitches) explained it to me this way:

    Use Retayne to prevent fabric from bleeding. Use Synthrpol (or other fabric catchers when your fabric has already bled. If you think a fabric might bleed, prevent it by using Retayne. If you have a 'surprise' of bleeding, Synthrapol will help remove the runs.

    She always knows how to break down a matter for a dumb newbie!

  5. #5
    Power Poster sueisallaboutquilts's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info, Bearisgray!! :)
    I bought some and forgot why lol

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the info. I guess I need both. I only bought one of them.

  7. #7
    Moderator Jim's Gem's Avatar
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    :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:
    Thanks for the info!

  8. #8

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    How do you get the water to 140 degrees? I tried it in the wash and even added boiling water and I could only get it to 130 degree. What is your secret?

    P.S. - My water heater was set to the highest setting too!

  9. #9
    Junior Member scrappycats's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltincin
    How do you get the water to 140 degrees? I tried it in the wash and even added boiling water and I could only get it to 130 degree. What is your secret?

    P.S. - My water heater was set to the highest setting too!
    I too wondered that. When I taught commercial cooking and the water had to be 140 degrees for washing dishes, we had to have a special booster heater installed to make it that hot.

  10. #10
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    I don't use either product -

    But it would seem to make sense to me to use the products as directed, if one is going to go to the expense and effort of using them.

    I soak new fabrics (similar colors and/or shades together) in water as hot as it comes from the tap (not hot enough to scald myself if I do a quick dip in it - but quite uncomfortable if I linger in it) for at least half an hour.

    I use the sink if I have a lot of items, a small kettle or bowl if it's something like a fat quarter.

    I smoosh the fabric(s) up and down a few times in the water maybe every ten minutes or so just to stir it up a bit.

    If the water is still clear, all is good and I put the piece aside to be very gently washed and dried.

    I think the agitation is what makes new fabric look "worn" in the washing process.

    If the water has acquired some color - I go through the pieces and see which one is putting out the color.

    I isolate that one and soak and rinse it some more until the water is clear - or almost clear.

    Then - when I think that the black (or whatever color) piece won't discolor that white (or other lighter colored) piece - I dump all the wet stuff into the washer and give it a quick gentle wash with just a smidgen of detergent - dry it on permanent press in the dryer until just dry - fold and put away until time to cut it.

    If I get a piece that continues to color the water - I will try to return it (if it's a relatively recent purchase and I still have the receipt)

    If the store won't accept it, I discard it. No point in mucking up my project or someone else's.

    I've had a couple of pieces that were still coloring 20 changes of water. There comes a time to accept that the piece is a loser!

    The stuff I make goes to people that do well to get things washed - forget about "special treatment"

    I do have a hissy about using liquid bleach when washing quilts.

    I have this idea that fabric should behave "on its own" and that the owner of the quilt should only need to use "reasonable care" when washing it.

    I do know about color catchers, etc. I just don't they should be necessary!

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