Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 20 of 20

Thread: Your Future Quilt

  1. #11
    Super Member tuesy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Home!.. Why? Where are you?
    Posts
    2,260
    These are such awesome pictures. Thank you! It reminds me of the movie Places in the Heart.

  2. #12
    Super Member IBQUILTIN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    North Fork Ca
    Posts
    6,874
    Great shots, and they do remind us where our quilting fabric starts. Good job

  3. #13
    Super Member cctx.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Corpus Christi, Texas (that's me!)
    Posts
    4,869
    Blog Entries
    2
    Come down to Robstown, Texas and you'll see more cotton growing, especially during the Spring and Summer. Drive down Highway 44 and you'll see pieces of cotton lining the entire highway on both sides of the Highway where the cotton is being transported. Robstown is about 18 miles away from Corpus Christi, Texas.

  4. #14
    Senior Member DeneK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Commerce, Ga
    Posts
    710
    There are huge cotton fields across from my house... They have just started harvesting. What amazes me is how much cotton is left on the bushes after they take the machines thru to harvest. Seems like such a shame. But I guess it is cost prohibitive to do it any differently.

    Also, about 2 weeks ago the crop dusters sprayed defoliant so that when they harvest, all that is left are the branches with the cotton bolls.

  5. #15
    Super Member mary quite contrary's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    2,541
    Quote Originally Posted by DeneK
    There are huge cotton fields across from my house... They have just started harvesting. What amazes me is how much cotton is left on the bushes after they take the machines thru to harvest. Seems like such a shame. But I guess it is cost prohibitive to do it any differently.

    Also, about 2 weeks ago the crop dusters sprayed defoliant so that when they harvest, all that is left are the branches with the cotton bolls.
    Thanks for the info. We kept seeing crop dusters and assumed it had to have something to do with harvesting but we didn't know what.

  6. #16
    Super Member nwm50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    5,189
    Isn't it neat to watch them grow and transforms into a fluff? We did peanuts 1st and then the cottons, my grandkids loves to get up close to'em and pull a few for show/tell @ school.
    The peanuts were pulled first & then they went over the vines and whipped into bales for feed and all that's left is the field.

  7. #17
    Super Member QuiltswithConvicts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,810
    Blog Entries
    2
    Were you in the Lubbock to Seminole area? That field looks like one that wasn't irrigated, but relied on nature to help. The irrigated fields are much hardier, bigger plants and way more cotton bolls.

    The cotton from the Lubbock to Seminole area isn't the premium quality needed for top notch fabric, but there are millions of uses for it anyway, like Q-tips & cotton balls. It's a rather short ataple. I agree, we need to keep on producing that cotton so we have plenty of gerige goods to send over to whereever thay send it to print and send back to us!

    I could spit everytime I think of everything that is produced in China. Indonesia can keep on producing our batiks, though! :thumbup:

  8. #18
    Super Member mary quite contrary's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    2,541
    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltswithConvicts
    Were you in the Lubbock to Seminole area? That field looks like one that wasn't irrigated, but relied on nature to help. The irrigated fields are much hardier, bigger plants and way more cotton bolls.

    The cotton from the Lubbock to Seminole area isn't the premium quality needed for top notch fabric, but there are millions of uses for it anyway, like Q-tips & cotton balls. It's a rather short ataple. I agree, we need to keep on producing that cotton so we have plenty of gerige goods to send over to whereever thay send it to print and send back to us!

    I could spit everytime I think of everything that is produced in China. Indonesia can keep on producing our batiks, though! :thumbup:
    We were in the north west corner of the state. I don't remember exactly where we stopped. It was fun to watch the harvest though.

  9. #19
    Super Member QuiltswithConvicts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,810
    Blog Entries
    2
    Isn't it?

    I don't understand how the cotton stays put in that large "brick" until the truck comes and what keeps it from falling apart as they load in into the truck.

  10. #20
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    San Bernardino
    Posts
    4,284
    I Agree With you On That.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.