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Thread: Ideal sewing desk?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Ideal sewing desk?

    I'm discovering (as I'm getting back into sewing after a long hiatus) that a quilting room ideally would have a cutting table and a sewing desk. I have a decent size table for cutting, but need (or really want) a sewing desk. Could you tell me your favorite and must-have (or would love to have) features in a sewing desk?

  2. #2
    Junior Member Reba'squilts's Avatar
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    I don't have the anwser...but I have been looking at the sew easy table on the web. The one I would be interested is around 500. More money then I want to spend. My machine is heavy, Viking Diamond, so I need something steady. BUT if I get this..then I probably need something else to use when I use the embroidery system. I saw a wonderful huge old desk at the habitat store yesterday...would be big enough to build in machine and use the other side to embroider. My DH does not want another job! So I do run on!!!! I will be watching for the anwsers with you! Good luck with your quest. Carol

  3. #3
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    I use an old office desk - a big metal one. I got it when a local company remodeled, and they were selling the desks for $15.00. It's an ugly shade of green, with a faux wood top. I love it. Big top, big drawers.

  4. #4
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    What would be ideal would be to afford the ones like they have on the sewing and quilting shows and videos. That being said most deal with what you can afford. My sewing table is a utility table (6ft. long) that folds. Wal Mart for 30 bucks. it's also my cutting table. I am using a small bedroom (considering myself lucky). I saw a huge office desk at the Goodwill but DH and I both decided it would be too difficult to get down the hall. My house is very small.

  5. #5
    Super Member lisalovesquilting's Avatar
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    I use a wood desk that I got at a discount furniture store for a great price (slight damage). Lots of drawer space and also store things under it.
    Peace is one of His greatest gifts.

  6. #6
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    I love 30 inches long (or more) tables, and if you have a cutout in table for the machine, all the better. I like that tables have plenty of leg room. Some sewing cabinets have drawers right up next to your legs. I like the free movement and generous space of tables, so I can pop up and down freely. You can always add drawers or cabinets, even if it is roller carts, but I hate the sewing machine space to have drawers right up at my legs. I really like to be able to swing around in my chair and move about freely. This can be very important not just for comfort but also to minimize stiff joints and edema.

  7. #7
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    I have a Arrow Gidget II which is a nice table, but I have a big heavy machine like you and it does work for embroidery but it is small so doesn't leave a whole lot of working space but it is a solid table that does a good job, and you can find the for about 180 without the insert and around 125 with insert which is a little cheaper than the sew ezi which is similar in size but a little small. My dream table is a koala, but those cost quite a pretty penny so those will wait
    Brother XL-3500i, SQ-9050, Dreamweaver XE6200D

  8. #8
    Super Member QuiltingNinaSue's Avatar
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    I have sewn on a cheap typewriter table that I put together myself for years with an ironing board on one side of it and a cutting table on the other side of it. I have seen nice looking sewing cabinets on QB that women have built, so if you do a search on QB, it might give you some ideas.

    That said, this year, my dh said to take the tax refund and get what I wanted for my sewing room and I did; plus a little more than the refund for the sewing room I wanted. Since I sew with Bernina and love it, I ordered the Horn desks. Three of the fold up kind (cheaper) and one good quilting sewing cabinet that we will share 'cause he quilts with me and sews his kilts. It is big, and does take a while to 'learn' it, but the 550 'fits' in quite well. All are very sturdy and fit in nicely and two were on sale which helped the price (by $500). I have a Bernina 1530 and Bernette Serger, adding a Bernina 550 and Deco 340 embroidery machine and a cutting table from JoAnns. Oh, and I will turn 71 years old this year, have worked full time and raised three children with DH, married for 47 years, so I thought it was high time to outfit my 'hobby' room.

    Each to their own comfort zone of doing it their way. The small typewriter stand was about $23.00 and worked just fine for me and pieced a lot of quilts. Good luck in finding your set up that you want. I looked at various folding tables on line, priced very sensible, and other alternatives. Check out estate sales, auction sales, good will stores, garage sales, local Craig lists, Wal Mart adjustable tables, four foot long about $59.00 and want ads in your area.

  9. #9
    Super Member ArchaicArcane's Avatar
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    The best sewing desks are the ones that fit you. At the end of the day, the machine doesn't care about where it's sitting, but your body sure will.

    I'm short, so I needed a shorter desk. All of the desks I saw were pretty much the same height. My shoulders were around my ears, my back super stretched out, and I felt like I was reaching for everything. Yes, you can take some of it up with an adjustable chair, but feet dangling in the air is not good for your legs. Yes, you can use a step stool or something to elevate your legs too.

    And -then- I saw the price tags. I can buy a lot of fabric and vintage machines for that! And I was going to have to modify or add things to make it fit me?

    Or you can fit the desk to you.

    The same goes if you're not height challenged.

    Something that can recess at least your main machine is best. You'll fight the fabric less, and not be as sore as a result. Something that can recess any machine you have (if you have more than one) is the ideal.

    As a general rule, something sturdy and made of real wood or metal will hold up longer than something that's made of man made materials or wobbly. Particle board should have the screws tightened once a year. Additionally, a heavier, sturdier desk will absorb more vibrations from the machine, especially the heavier and high speed ones

    These were my requirements. The desk I wanted didn't exist. I'm one of the QBers who built / modified.

    We cut 2" off the bottom of the legs. We cut a hole that would accomodate any machine I have, and cut Lexan inserts for each machine. We created a height adjustment for the machines to be level with the top of the desk. We routed the ledge for the insert to sit on. This was all done to a Government surplus desk.

    When I say "we", I don't mean the royal "We", as in I gave DH the instructions and said bring it back when it's done. I did as much or more of the work than he did. With a little time and patience, you can do all of the work yourself. The only tool that consistently over challenges me is the router. I'm sure you could get DH or a family friend to route a quick ledge if push comes to shove.
    Tammi - I've found that many baby steps tend to get you further than a huge leap in followed by a huge leap out - http://www.archaicarcane.com
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  10. #10
    Super Member Misty's Mom's Avatar
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    I use a table from ikea
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