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Thread: SURVEY for COMIC BOARD users

  1. #71
    Super Member SewExtremeSeams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by njoyk View Post
    You can easily remove a fabric within a stack of ruler folded fabrics by sliding the ruler in the pile above the fabric you want, lifting the pile, removing your choice, placing the ruler back and sliding it out.
    Great idea!! I hadn't tried that... my method of pulling fabric has definitely been messier... and always when I didn't want to take the time to straighten the fabric pile out. LOL

  2. #72
    Junior Member craftykk's Avatar
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    i like the idea of the boards, i think they look so nice. one of the local quilt shops here has them on those and the little small ones, too. i always thought it would be so nice. i'm concerned because my flourescent lights in my craft room used to fade my cardstock when i had it out in the open. does anyone know if this is something i have to worry about with my fabric? i'll do some investigating online to try to find out.
    Last edited by craftykk; 03-12-2012 at 04:55 PM.

  3. #73
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    I love the boards. I bought the cheaper (acid free) on one side. I found that for larger yardages (like 4 yds) or more that they tended to be flemsy. I purchase some foam boards (8 1/2 x 11) from Uline for about 70 cents each for the larger yardages of fabric. More expensive but they may great bracers on the shelves. I will order more. Mine are not acid free but the acid free are available....just much more expensive. What happens if the boards are not acid free? I am not familiar with the failure of the non-acid free boards.

  4. #74
    Senior Member BeverlyH's Avatar
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    I have my fabric wrapped on comic boards and am so pleased that I decided to dig in and do it! It is so easy to do and just changed my collection totally. I even bought a pack of 100 for my bosses wife and she ended up ordering 4 more and likes it as much as I do.
    Take care of our earth. It's the only planet with chocolate!

  5. #75
    Super Member brushandthimble's Avatar
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    I use 2 together and have from the first time I started wrapping. Just felt 1 was too flimsy. I was using a glue stick to keep the boards together, now I use double sided tape. Bought 9 x 12 from the comic book store, about 100 for $9.99
    After 2 years with the same signature I have been requested to remove it. Bye

  6. #76
    Super Member damaquilts's Avatar
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    I just got in some fabric for a project . Put it on the boards and in my shelves after washing. Nice and neat. And I could find it when I was ready.:-) that is a miracle in my room. Don't think I will be changing again any time soon. This is the 4th or 5th way I have folded my fabric. And the other thing I like is I took the time to measure each piece as I was wrapping it and wrote it on non slick side of the board in pencil so I know how much is on the piece without undoing it each time. No they are not as sturdy as some on the market but neither are they as expensive. I sure can't afford almost $1 each for a board(not at over 300 pieces of fabric) nor can I sit and cut up a bunch of foam board. But they give just enough support to keep it from flopping over ,and the fabric next to it keeps it from falling over. they are tight in my shelf. The only thing I need to find is some way to secure the ends. I used applique pins but they are bent when I take them out and well their straight pins , they poke me and catch on things.

  7. #77
    Senior Member Sewze's Avatar
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    I use the large plastic paper clips that you can get from Staples or Office Depot to hold the fabric on the boards; they come in multiple colors.
    Jinnie

  8. #78
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    This is what I found on the internet. At this time I am continuing to use my comic boards but in the future I may purchase those that are said to be acid free on both sides. I only use 1 board and I have wrapped as much as 7 yards on 1 board.

    This is an excerpt I got off of a comic book site. "What is most important is purchasing archival safe boards (again, there are degrees to this too) ensuring proper care of books for the duration of their storage.Comic book boards have two sides to them: one side is rough and matte, the other side is smooth and glossy. Since boards are only intended to protect one comic, only one side is treated, this is the smooth side of the board. "

    I interpret this to mean that only 1 side is treated to be acid free. I have used these boards myself and never thought about the claims of 'acid free'.

    I then found this link which performed a test of the comic book boards. http://boards.collectors-society.com...Number=4534727. Essentially the results said "In contrast, every single buffered board (E Gerber and Bill Cole) passed the acid-free test - on these boards, both sides were pH neutral (or slightly alkaline), and as these boards are buffered throughout (not coated), the entire board can therefore be considered acid-free.

    Sounds like we need to buy E Gerber's Half-Back,Bill Cole's Thin-X-Tender, or Bill Cole's Life-X-Tender boards to be truly archival safe. Of course this is not what I have.

    Looks like the Bill Cole's are twice as expensive but I found the E Gerber Half back for 9.99 per 100 at comic supply ( sizes/prices vary based on size of comic book).

  9. #79
    Junior Member craftykk's Avatar
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    From my local comic store I found out there are different thicknesses of the boards, some go inside the comic and some are called backing boards which are thicker and make it sturdier, so those are the ones we'd want. i found this on a site he directed me to http://www.comicpreservation.com/

    He said he never recommends the "economy" ones for comics except for very short term use.

    "Acid Free Backing Boards link

    These stiff boards are made of cloth/rags or wood/paper. They are usually a little bigger than the size comic book, they are made to support. These boards are inserted in a mylar sleeve usually in back of a comic book. The board helps supports the comic, to preventing bending the book and also getting creases in it or color breaks on its cover. The acid free nature of these board helps protect the comic book from acid migration found in the aging process of paper.

    Some boards come with a 3% to 4% calcium carbonate buffer at a ph of about 8.00 added to the acid free backing. The idea is to help reduce the amount of environmental pollutes from getting into the comic. Backing boards fall under the area of Archival Board in the field of document preservation and in art presentation as a support product such as mattes."

    They're much cheaper at your local store than amazon, plus you can see them in person and make sure you're getting the ones you want.
    Last edited by craftykk; 03-15-2012 at 06:45 AM.

  10. #80
    Junior Member craftykk's Avatar
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    For me personally, I hope to always be using my fabric continuously and not necessarily storing or collecting it for years so I'm not sure my own concern would be the acid free for super long term storage but I would like it to stand on the shelf without bowing too much or bending too easily. And I'm with whoever it was who said save your money and spend it on fabric, haha..so I think I may keep looking for a free option..like boards from the fabric store, maybe. Not sure yet. Fortunately for me I don't have nearly as much fabric as most of you so whatever I do it won't be as intense at this point. So it's a good time for me to figure out a system. Right now i have mine in bins on a cube shelf from target. I admit it would be nice to have them on the shelf on boards so I don't have to dig through the bin each time to find what I want. But the other thing is I have LOTS of smaller pieces, fat quarters and the like and since I use mine so much I'm not sure it would be time efficient to wrap them so I'd probably keep them in the bins or stack them like some of you have. I don't know yet, too much to think about right now, lol. I might go with the ruler wrapping method some of you have talked about. I wonder if you can even stand them up on a shelf if you have enough to fill a shelf so they aren't falling over?

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