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Thread: Old Quit Top

  1. #1
    skpkatydid's Avatar
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    Here is a quilt top that I got when my mom died. I think she got it from her mom. Could anyone identify the fabric age? It is machine pieced.

    There are a few holes. How would you ( anyone) repair this as well as finishing?

    and it is an old *quilt* top. (grin)

    a corner hole
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  2. #2
    Super Member Quilt Mom's Avatar
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    Sorry. I am no help on dating a quilt. Pretty top. Are you going to quilt it? Might there be a way to replace the torn area with some similar fabric? Someone else will have a better idea than mine, no doubt.

  3. #3
    Super Member beachlady's Avatar
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    Could you do some applique over the holes? Put some where there are no holes too and then it looks like it was on purpose. Sorry have no idea about the age.

  4. #4
    jewelps's Avatar
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    that is a treasure, from the looks of it, my grandma used to have some fabric like that, it has to be about or more than 30 years old, the fabric looks like the same thread count or grain, that my grandma had, about 20 years ago and at that time you couldn't find that kind of material, as for your hole i would try heatnbond, therm o web, wonder under, what ever you want to call it, with you using that you want have to change the original pattern, hope this helps

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by beachlady
    Could you do some applique over the holes? Put some where there are no holes too and then it looks like it was on purpose. Sorry have no idea about the age.
    I was thinking applique also. If there had been squares in the quilt top, you could have cut a square the same size, plus 1/4 inch seam allowance, turned under the allowance and hand-stitched the square over the damaged spot. That's what I did to repair/replace worn-out centers on a log cabin quilt my sister has.

  6. #6

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    Looking at the close up of the fabric print, I think it may be from earlier...maybe the 30s or 40s. The coarse look of the weave and the colors suggest that age to me. You could always applique a similar looking flower applique of one of the colors in the print over the torn area. Should be fairly easy to do. Don't know how sturdy the fabric is. Check and see how easily it might tear by testing a corner area. If it tears easily, I wouldn't put a lot of time into the quilting. You could do a quick all over flower quilting design either by hand or machine. My sister also has sewn an inexpensive old lace over an old fabric to hold it together if it isn't so very "sound."

  7. #7
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    how much do you love this top? and how much quilting are you willing to do on it?

    in a collection, a small piece of tulle fabric in the same color on the top and the bottom to cover the hole would create a structure while you stitched the sandwich together. with a dense quilting pattern, the hole would never be noticed. but you have to determine if the top is really going to hold up well enough to warrant the work. in a collection, it would be handled with great care, i.e. never left in the sun, never allowed to crease, and most importantly, never handled. if you think you love it that much and are willing to enjoy it for as long as it does last, then go for it.

    just remember that if the fabric is weak it won't last forever. it lasted this long because it was put away.

  8. #8
    skpkatydid's Avatar
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    You are right , butterflywing. The fabric is not of high quality. I don't even know if it could take quilting. I really don't like it except that it was something from my grandmothers time. I think I will just keep it safe. Thinks for everyones input.

  9. #9
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    then wrap it in acid-free paper, roll it in clean muslin tied off at the ends, keep it in a dark closet, and hold it for your own grown-up children, so they have a piece of their own history. once in a while, gently shake the dust out.

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