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Thread: Ragged Flannels--last one!!

  1. #1
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    I wrote the description under each photo--but they posted out of order. I didn't want you to think I couldn't count! :wink:

    Thanks for looking....


    The third is one my daughter designed. It was tricky because she wanted so much in it! But it always works out. :-)
    Name:  Attachment-2716.jpe
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    The first is for a dear friend who's had several bouts with cancer. The last was a blood type that required two bond marrow transfers. She's now doing great! She's a flower lover.
    Name:  Attachment-2753.jpe
Views: 336
Size:  30.4 KB

    The second is one I made for a student--but it's one her mom paid me to do. They bought the material--and once the squares were done, I had the student over to help lay out the pattern.
    Name:  Attachment-66189.jpe
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  2. #2
    Super Member Celeste's Avatar
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    Those are so pretty! When I first heard about this type I was skeptical, but I'm sold and have one in the works.

  3. #3
    joy
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    What is the name of the piece of equipment like scissors that you need to cut the edges.....please...

  4. #4
    Super Member Kyiav10's Avatar
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    They are all wonderful. I especially love the green one as it is my favorite color!!! Kyia

  5. #5
    community benefactor ShellyQ's Avatar
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    Those are all choice :thumbup: I love the warm snuggly look of raggy quilts

  6. #6
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    joy--I use regular scissors--just have to be careful. I used one pair for snipping in close (they were sharper on the tips) and another pair for ragging between--(they were sharper in the back of the blades). At first I could only rag 3 rows at a time (sore thumb) but now I can go on and on. :-)

  7. #7
    Senior Member Denise's Avatar
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    oh beautiful quilts, i haven't made one yet. They look so soft and cuddley. Must put this quilt in my to do list. Great work, love your colors. Denise

  8. #8

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    Hi,
    saw your pictures on your ragged quilt. I am interested in making one, where can I get the instructions and what type of material can you use. I have alot of scraps. Any infor would be appreciated.

  9. #9
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    Hi Nurnie--Let me get the ones I typed up---be right back...


    Okay--I found it--but I've not attached a word document before. if this doesn't work, I'll email them to you.

    I use all flannel. A scrap one would look delicious. :D My next one will be for my niece for her wedding in September. They both love the Fall--so that will be easy.

    Good luck!

    Okay--that said it had to be downloaded--which probably wouldn't be a problem, but I'm going to paste them here. If any ragged flannel makers have suggestions--please add them!!


    Ragged Flannel Quilt
    1. Buy your flannel—2 colors, or more. Maybe about 7 yards all together—it’s hard to know how much to get. One pattern says 6.25 yards for a twin size. I’d hate for there not to be enough for the size you want, then have the store not have more of your color. I usually buy 1-3 yards of several colors that match, then I have enough to play around with them. It sounds like a lot, but remember it’s the back too.

    2. Also buy some Warm and Natural cotton batting—about 3 yards because it’s extra long? (I’m not good at yardage—but that one you can get more of if you need to.)

    3. There are many options as to square size. You can cut your flannel into 6 inch, 7 inch, 8 inch squares. The bigger they are, the faster it’ll go together, but the smaller the squares, the more interesting your pattern will be. I always cut the flannel into 7 inch squares. If you want, you can cut any scrap pieces into rectangles 7 x 4 inch pieces. Two rectangles sewn together will equal one square. They add even more fun to the finished product!

    4. Cut the batting into 5 ¾” squares. For rectangles, the batting needs to be 5 ¾ x 2 ¾ inches.

    5. Choose 2 flannel squares of the same color and 1 batting square. Layer the squares of batting between the 2 quilt squares so the right sides of the flannel are facing the out. (let me know if you need a picture) Then sew each square from corner to corner—so there’s an X across the square. I eye it up, but you may want to draw on a line to follow. Use a continuous seam to sew these together, first one line, then the other. Are you familiar with the continuous seam? It’s so easy, and makes things so much faster, AND it saves on thread!

    6. For any rectangle pieces, I just sew a wavy line from the middle of one short side to the middle of the opposite side.

    7. Complete every square and rectangle in this way.

    8. Lay out the squares in the pattern you like. Take a picture if you have a digital camera.

    9. Pick up each row by starting at one end and stacking each square under the previous one. Label each pile with its row number. Pin the row number on the top square.

    10. Sew all the rows together, using a ½ seam. Make sure all seams are on the same side.

    11. Sew each row to the next, pinning at every seam so they match perfectly. Lock the seams—meaning have one folded to each side as they are sewn together. Make sure all seams are on the same side. (I always goof at least once and have to rip a row apart.) It pays to double check.

    12. Now sew around the whole quilt using a ½ seam.

    13. Once the whole quilt is together, you need to rag it. I place the quilt, folded at a seam facing toward me, on the ironing board, and clip almost to the seam—all the way from one end to the other—about ¼- ½ inch apart. The directions say to snip right to the seam, but I have never gotten that close. Now and then, you will cut through the seam. Just stick it under your sewing machine and repair it by sewing over that area again. It happens.

    14. Once ever seam is clipped, clip around the whole outside.

    15. Now, shake your beautiful creation outside to get some of the lint off.

    16. Most directions say to wash the quilt now, but I have found it works to just spray the front well with water, and wet the back a bit too. You decide what you’d like to do.

    17. Shake the quilt outside again. Then put it in the dryer. The dryer will be what makes the seams rag up.

    18. Now and then clean your lint filter and even shake the quilt outside again.

    19. Smile, you’re done. J



  10. #10
    community benefactor Knot Sew's Avatar
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    Rag quilts must be popular all over, fiscars makes several sizes of clippers, all labeled for rag quilts. These are spring loaded and hanging with the other brands. they have short blades and are very sharp at the tips.
    Rag quilts can be put together, cut and sewed in just a few days. good when you are in a hurry for a gift. :D

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