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Thread: Canning Green Beans - Question

  1. #1
    Senior Member ncredbird's Avatar
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    I am pressure canning for the first time - doing green beans.
    The first batch is finished and two of the jars expelled enough of the liquid for it to fall below the top of the beans in the jar. They all sealed properly. How long can I keep the jars in which the green beans are not completely covered by the liquid? Thanks, Ann in TN

  2. #2
    Super Member jillnjo's Avatar
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    I wouldn't worry about the amount of liquid if it is sealed. They should be fine for as long as ones that stayed covered. I used to can green beans with very little liquid and had no problems.

  3. #3
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    I agree. They will be fine. Most all of mine lose some liquid. The important part is that they seal.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Quilting Nonnie's Avatar
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    You can call your county extension for help with canning questions.

    Here is what I found on the web:

    Sometimes after processing, some of the water or canning liquid in the jar is lost and doesn't cover the product. Lost water is most common when pressure canning, especially with starchy foods. Typical causes and solutions are:

    Packing the food too tightly or loosely in the jar.
    Starchy foods, such as corn, peas or lima beans, absorbed all the liquid. Use more liquid with these starchy vegetables.
    Air naturally entrained within the fruit or vegetable that wasn't released (generally this happens more with raw pack than hot pack)
    The jars filled too full (too much vegetable/fruit compared to the amount of liquid).
    In pressure canning: Fluctuating pressure in the pressure canner. Let pressure return to zero gradually, avoiding the sudden release of pressure through the vent. Do not hasten the cooling with cold water.
    In water bath canning: The jars are not totally covered with boiling water during the boiling water bath processing.
    The food was not heated prior to filling (Raw pack method) -
    All air bubbles were not removed prior to sealing the lids and rings on the jars.

    As long as the jars remained sealed, they'll be ok, but they should be checked more frequently and used up first!
    http://www.pickyourown.org/canning-p...-of-liquid.php

  5. #5
    np3
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    Power Poster np3's Avatar
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    They will be fine, but I would use them first!

  6. #6
    Senior Member clynns's Avatar
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    I've used them up to 2 years. I can everything. 13 lbs of pressure for 20 minutes I think. LOL They may discolor a bit from not being in the liquid, but they should be fine. Caution: if canning vegetable soup, wait to add the meat until you are ready to heat. I added mine and my kids loved it, but I guess I was fortunate that it didn't go bad. I don't need food posioning to learn a lesson. My county extension agency literally GAVE me a notebook filled with canning recipes, canning times, everything at no cost. It was well worth $50.00. Just to have it copied would cost close to that. It doesn't hurt to ask if they have something like that. Cheryl

  7. #7
    Senior Member ncredbird's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone!
    I thought it would be fine and I should use them first. We picked 6 gallons of green beans from the garden last night so have been processing them all day. We have a church pot luck to go to tomorrow and my granddaughter said "Hey Grandma, why don't we make a big pot of green beans for the pot luck. That way you don't have to can a bunch of them." Smart girl, but I have just processed my 14th jar today and put 5 pounds in the freezer sealed in the food saver. Glad to be finished for today. Ann

  8. #8
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    thanks, quilting nonnie, that is good to know

  9. #9
    Super Member quiltsRfun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by np3
    They will be fine, but I would use them first!
    That's what I'd do.

    Isn't it nice to see all your freshly canned jars lined up. It makes you feel like you've really accomplished something. And they'll taste so good this winter.

  10. #10
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    Anybody ever make Leather Britches? They taste very good when cooked.

    You simply string them and don't cut the beans. Sew through them with a heavy thread and hang till dry, Grandma used to put them on the porch or attic, out of the weather. Then they'd go into paper sacks which still hung in the attic. Then when they were put into soup or whatever, had a stronger taste.

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