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Thread: Do you have that salt ris'n bread recipe??

  1. #1

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    My mom's favorite and I finally found a recipe for it, but, don't even think some of the ingredients are edible:))LOL I'd love to surprise her..so, does anyone have more of a modern one??Thanks Skeat

  2. #2
    Super Member ScubaK's Avatar
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    oooohhh....
    Salt rising bread...delicious...
    Anyone have a recipe?
    K

  3. #3

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    Google's first three results, which happen to be my three favorite recipe sites. Haven't looked at these, but I'm all for the ABM (automatic bread machine) to try first. Third on the list uses nondegerminated cornmeal??? Do you lift their little tails to determine this?

    Google results:

    This bread demands a delicate, tricky process that will give you a uniquely delicious result. Starter is made from salt, cornmeal and sugar in milk, ...
    allrecipes.com/Recipe/Salt-Rising-Bread/Detail.aspx

    Old fashioned salt rising bread recipe. ... Salt-Rising Bread. By Diana Rattray, About.com ... Next, add shortening, 1/2 cup sugar and salt. Mix well. ...
    southernfood.about.com/od/breadmachine/r/bl10817k.htm

    Salt Rising Bread Recipe #11713 @ CDKitchen.com :: it's what's ...
    A recipe for Salt Rising Bread containing ***Starter*** medium-size potatoes peeled sliced thin quart boiling water nondegerminated cornmeal, ...
    www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/409/Salt_Rising_Bread14263.shtml

  4. #4

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    Aw, shucks. The ABM recipe isn't! Obviously in the wrong category. I haven't made four loaves of bread at once in a couple of years; was hoping for a single-loaf recipe.

    And the cook at AllRecipes admits "THIS IS NOT AN EASY BREAD TO MAKE! It is tricky, but worth the effort for one who loves that very different, pungent smell of salt-rising bread. The cornmeal used for the starter must contain the inner germ of the corn and a constant warm temperature must be maintained." No, no, no. I've spent years trying to make reliable sourdough and am not ready to be led down the garden path one more time. The photo accompanying this recipe shows a crumbly-textured result.

    The CDKitchen recipe is straight-forward but you're going to spend a couple of days trying to regulate temperature. Included here is an excerpt from the Fanny Farmer cookbook, posted on the site: "The name 'salt-rising bread' stems from the original method of keeping the dough warm: the bowl of dough was set in a large container of warmed rock salt, which held the heat for a long time."

    Gotta go--my ABM just finished a delectable loaf of garlic-herb bread for me.

    P.S. Non-degerminated cornmeal is stone-ground.




  5. #5

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    Judy Lee...thank you for all your hard work in this! Love the "nondegerminated cornmeal" comment...and, have to tell you I asked the same thing about 'virgin wool' once:))LOL Too funny!! I'm going to check these out and you need to send me a slice of that bread...sounds delicious!! Skeat

  6. #6

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    Oh, Skeat. I surely would if I could, share some garlic-herb bread with you. We could sit in my kitchen and kill the whole loaf between us while talking about quilts.

    I began making this bread only five or six loaves ago, and even peanut butter and jelly are good on it. Who'da thunk it? Rosemary, thyme, and basil are the herbs, and I use garlic powder rather than fresh garlic.

    Bread is the one thing I can do, and I enjoy doing it, so this thread really caught my eye. Let us know if and when you find a recipe you can live with, and how it turned out.

  7. #7

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    Yes...we could eat all that loaf in minutes:0)LOL Being a midwest girl..bread has never been a issue...it has always been our staple daily:))My dad use to sit at that table and say 'bread, butter, salt and pepper and something to drink'...yes, he thought he was funny:))But, it was true:))I am the breads leader here for 4H. I don't do the bread machine but, my mom does. I do it the old fashioned way...muscle:))which helps burn the calories before we eat it:))LOL I will share the recipe soon...:))Skeat

  8. #8

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    I think this recipe is a user friendly one! Go to: http://southernfood.about.com/od/bre...r/bl10817k.htm

  9. #9

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    Okay, that's the one I'll try. Looks much easier than the older recipes. (Guess I threw out my keg of salt too early.)

    I, too, am a muscle-breadster but there's no one around now to eat what is produced. I miss massaging the yeasty-beasties, but for a retired single like me the ABM is the berries.

    My sourdough bread was passable but I came to the conclusion that steam-injected ovens are necessary to deliver the tangy taste that commercial bakers have accustomed us to. Didn't feel like lining my oven with baker's brick, and never got around to investing in a cloche, or building a proofing box. Invested in a lot of books, though, so made some authors happy.

    Our taste buds and expectations have been so manipulated by commercial bakery products that a home-grown effort seems not up to par. I have cookbooks from the 1920s, and those recipes don't result in anything approaching the taste we expect today. We are products of our times.

    Bread. It seems to come with a dose of philosophy. Thanks for the recipe and I certainly will use it. Is your 4H group going to try it?

  10. #10

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    I think it will be a great one for one of them to take to fair..and, I say that w/o trying it yet:))It sounds great though. Maybe we should start a bread thread for others to share bread recipes. Then again, maybe we should just pm each other since we are the only chatter boxes here:))Yes, love homemade breads just like you!:))And, I agree on the old recipes...I have found though that using real 'lard' can make a world of difference. Not heart smart but, sure yoummy:))There is where the oldies had their flavor:))Skeat

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