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Thread: Peach canning question

  1. #11
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    I'm thinking you need to at least use a light syrup for fruit. Otherwise the sugars from the fruit will leech into the canning liquid and the fruit will not retain its natural sweetness. If you need to have less sugar in the finished product, rinse it when taking it out of the jar. It's been several years since I have done food preservation but I'm thinking that used to be the recommendation for either canning or freezing fruit. Do they still recommend a product such as Fruit Fresh to prevent browning, esp of peaches?

  2. #12
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    According to the USDA new guidelines, they can be done without sugar. You can use plain water, or I used white grape juice cut with water. I just added water to the juice until it tasted good to me. I don't like super sweet stuff.
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    During WW2, my Grandma would hot water can peaches, and since sugar was rationed, she did not use it. Just put in some whole cloves to keep the "ugh" taste away.

  3. #13
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    [quote=CoyoteQuilts]When the pit comes out easy. If they are not quite ripe the fruit sticks to the pit. You want the fruit soft/firm...
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    There are two types of peaches. There is what is called 'Freestone" and a "Cling". That describes them quite well. One you make one long cut all around it and it will twist off into 2 pieces. The other one you have to cut smaller pieces of and won't get whole halves.

    My very favorite of all peaches is the Elberta, which is a very famous old one.

  4. #14
    Super Member Rann's Avatar
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    Peach pickles are good also.

  5. #15
    lbc
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    Senior Member lbc's Avatar
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    Canning peaches brings back memories of my Mom. She placed each peach so carefully that the jar looked like a piece of art when she was through filling it.

  6. #16
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    Did you know you can make peach jelly from the peelings? It is wonderful.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpwagner
    I usually put them in a large brown paper grocery bag, (one layer of peaches) with the bag laying on its side. Lightly close the bag. Check from time to time but in a day or two, when you open the bag to check, you can really smell the peaches. You will know they are ripe.
    This is exactly what I do.

  8. #18
    Junior Member terry leffler's Avatar
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    When they're as ripe as you want them (not too soft, as they cook in the water bath & soften more) drop them in boiling water ( a few at a time) for a minute or so & them put them in ice water - the skin will come right off. Then you score around the peach with a knife - right to the pit. Grab with both hands & twist & it should come apart in half where you can cut out the pit. I then drop the 1/2s in cold water with lemon juice to prevent browning. I have never heard of not using a sugar syrup - maybe you can substitute Splenda?
    Go for it & good luck!

  9. #19
    Junior Member Kieta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by terry leffler
    When they're as ripe as you want them (not too soft, as they cook in the water bath & soften more) drop them in boiling water ( a few at a time) for a minute or so & them put them in ice water - the skin will come right off. Then you score around the peach with a knife - right to the pit. Grab with both hands & twist & it should come apart in half where you can cut out the pit.
    this is my favorite canning trick. works great with peaches & tomatoes. as for sugar, i prefer a very light sugar to water ratio. with just water it seems as if the peach flavor leaches out into the water. with all the work you put into canning you do want a good result. sugar or fruit juice will help keep the flavor intact.

  10. #20
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    [quote=Ramona Byrd]
    Quote Originally Posted by CoyoteQuilts
    When the pit comes out easy. If they are not quite ripe the fruit sticks to the pit. You want the fruit soft/firm...
    ---------------------------
    There are two types of peaches. There is what is called 'Freestone" and a "Cling". That describes them quite well. One you make one long cut all around it and it will twist off into 2 pieces. The other one you have to cut smaller pieces of and won't get whole halves.

    My very favorite of all peaches is the Elberta, which is a very famous old one.
    I was going to say the same thing. Don't let them get too soft as your fruit will be mushy. If they peel easily their good to go. Blanching the fruit makes peeling much easier. I place a Tbsp of honey in the jar then fill the jar with water. I'm envious. Have fun.

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