Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 9 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 85

Thread: Figuring out Color

  1. #1
    Senior Member tkhooper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Gladys, VA
    Posts
    770
    As I work on my first quilt I realize that I need to know a lot about color that I don't know. So I've been searching for information that will help me make the quilts that really have that WOW factor. So far this is what I've found.

    It isn't just color that I need to consider. But it's a good place to start. And the first thing I need is a Paint Color Wheel. If you have one for photography that one is different and won't work the same as the one I'm working with.

    If you know how to work a color wheel skip this part.

    The color wheel has cool colors on the left hand side if yellow is pointed up. It has warm colors on the right hand side.

    The primary colors are Yellow, Red and Blue. The secondary colors are Orange, Purple, and Green.

    Complementary Colors are opposite one another on the color wheel.

    Ok start reading again if you skipped the part about how the color wheel works.

    Now about Color Schemes. There are six standard color schemes that will give you good color combinations to help you get started choosing your fabrics.

    Monochromatic - This just uses one color.

    Complementary - Here only two colors are used and they are opposite one another on the color wheel.

    Triad - As you guessed this uses three colors and they are all equal distant from each other on the color wheel. So the primary colors would fall into this color scheme and so would the secondary colors.

    Tetrad - Four colors are used in the color scheme. Here you would choose complemetary colors on the color wheel but not use them. Instead you would use the colors on each side of each color. So if you choose Yellow and Purple as you complements you would use Green, Orange, Blue and Red.

    Analogic - This is a three color combination. Here the three colors would all be beside one another on the color wheel.

    Accented Analogic - Is another color scheme that uses 4 colors. It has the 3 colors all beside one another on the color wheel but an extra color is added. The complement to the center color is included in this scheme.

    These six combinations can make some basic fabric choices much easier; but, it doesn't stop there.

    We also have neutral colors that aren't on the color wheel. These include: White, Black, Grey, Browns, Tans and Creams. These colors can be included in any color scheme without disrupting the look of the scheme. Or they can be used exclusively to make an eye catching quilt. silver and gold also fall into the neutral colors if they are a metalic.

    Once the color scheme is choosen are we done?

    Since I'm still talking probably not. In order for a quilt to pop we need to understand how to use not just the hue but the warmth of the color.

    Cool colors are blue green and purple. Warm colors are Yellow Orange and Red. Cool colors recede in a pattern. Warm colors pop. This is important to know especially if you choose to use all of one or the other; because, your going to have to use a different technique to get the quilt to pop.

    That different technique is color value. Color value is how light or dark a color is. For example a pale yellow is very light. While an antique gold would be a medium color. So if you were doing a monochromatic quilt in yellows and you wanted it to pop putting a pale yellow next to an antique gold would cause the pale yellow to pop and the antique gold to recede.

    If you are choosing color on the computer the easiest way to decide it's "value" is to import it into a graphic program and then select a black and white view. This will give you the "grayscale" Where a color falls between white and black on this scale is it's value.

    So lets go back to our color schemes. (Wish I had a stash right now)

    Monochromatic. Lets say I want to do a blue quilt. In order to make it interesting I want to make sure I have a selection of values of blue. What does that mean?

    I want one fabric that is a blue small print with a white background. That fabric is going to pop in my pattern. Then maybe I want the same pattern but with a black background. That one will recede in my pattern. And maybe I want a solid blue as well. That will work as a mid-value color. If you choose a large print fabric be aware that depending on how you cut the fabric some pieces may have one value and another piece a different value depending on where on the fabric you cut. If anyone has an example of a monochromatic quilt and would like to share it please do.

    Complementary Color Scheme -

    Ok, lets go with christmas colors red and green. Make sure that the basic color are about the same value. For example if you go with a burgandy then choose a forest green to go with it. Both of these are in the darker values for their colors.

    Would you believe I'm late for an appointment. I'll be back later to finish this.

  2. #2
    Senior Member tkhooper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Gladys, VA
    Posts
    770
    I have a few more minutes.

    A nice addition to the red and green would be one or more of the neutrals. Now so far we have one cool and one warm color so the red is going to have the pop factor. If white is added it will become the pop factor. But if black is added the red will continue to dominate the color scheme. And again if a red print has a white background it will take center stage. But if you add a green with a white background it's going to come in conflict with the red and they will fight for dominance. So if those are your color choices placement is going to become incredible important.
    The lesson here is constantly pay attention to the value of your colors/fabrics.

    Triad - I think we have all seen primary color quilts done for children they are bright and charming and eye catching. But triads can also be busy and fight with one another. There will always be two colors on the same "side" of the color wheel. So you will either have two warm colors (dominate) or two cool colors (submissive). A neutral will "control" this color combination and help make it into the color scheme that will pop. If you have two warm colors and choose White that will become the dominate color and will calm down the yellows and reds. If you have two cool colors and choose black or brown then your warm color will really dominate while the blue and green will blend with the neutral.

    Tetrad - This one is fun lets say you choose yellow and purple as your complementary colors. You won't use either of those colors. Your color palette will consist of orange and green, blue and red. Here the orange and red will dominate and the green and blue will be submissive in the color scheme. Varing the value of the colors in your fabric choice will enhance the wow factor but placement of the different colors requires very close attention.

    Analogic - This is one of my favorites. I think it can make some very elegant quilts. With three colors next to each other you can have Yellow, Orange, Red combinations where all the colors are dominate with yellow being the "lightest" value and thus taking the main stage. With red being the darkest and thus falling to the background color. A large focus pint with these colors can make some fantastic medalion quilts. The addition of neutrals can definitely add drama and impact.

    Accented analogic - 4 colors with a complementary color as a part of the mix can make for just about any combination you would like. Add neutrals and the sky is the limit. Just watch out that it doesn't become chaotic.

    I'll try and look up any questions that you have and get you answers. I hope this has helped.

  3. #3
    Super Member Feathers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    3,029
    TK: THANK YOU...I have so much trouble with colors and usually struggle mightily in selection. You narration will really help me. I appreciate your time and effort in putting all of this together for all of us "color-tarded" quilters.

  4. #4
    Super Member dakotamaid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    South central Nebraska, US
    Posts
    5,365
    Thank you for this tut! I'm printing this out when I get home. :D

  5. #5
    Senior Member tkhooper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Gladys, VA
    Posts
    770
    Your very very welcome. This is only the beginning hopefully I'll be able to delve into optical illusions, Shimmery fabrics, Textured and Three D fabrics. There is a hole lot to explore yet.

  6. #6
    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Central Indiana (USA)
    Posts
    31,246
    Blog Entries
    194
    Thanks again for all of your hard work and information on color.

  7. #7
    Super Member JanetM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    At my LQS
    Posts
    2,349
    Thank you, thank you, thank you. I know that the choice of colors will either make or break the quilt so having this information really will help me.
    I really appreciate you taking time from your quilting to share this with us. Everyday I am amazed at the generosity of members like you in sharing information that benefits so many of us.
    Thank you so much :-D :-D :-D

  8. #8
    Senior Member tkhooper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Gladys, VA
    Posts
    770
    Your very welcome. I needed to learn the information too.

  9. #9
    Super Member Sheila Elaine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Crossville, Alabama
    Posts
    3,436
    Thanks TK. Now I'll be on the look-out to see if I can figure out which color scheme is used in a quilt & see if that helps determine whether I like the quilt or now. It makes sense that it would.

  10. #10
    Senior Member tkhooper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Gladys, VA
    Posts
    770
    I did that at the quilt show I went to on Saturday. There was a monochromatic in green that hadn't used any neutrals and I found it to be very busy. It was beautiful but it wasn't restful if that makes any sense. I find I'd rather look at something that pops. Than something that is busy. The "grandmothers garden" pattern always thrills me when it is done on a black background.

Page 1 of 9 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.