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Thread: Several of you have asked me to explain how I do Painless Binding...

  1. #1
    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
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    You asked me to share how I do binding. Here it is, if you have more questions just ask. I cut bias strips 2.5 inches wide, and long enough to go around the quilt. I usually just cut a yard of fabric at a time. If I have extra, I save it for another project. I iron it in half lengthwise, using spray sizing. I start in the middle of a side, leaving a 1 foot 'tail' hanging loose, and sew it, with a 1/4 inch seam, all the way around the quilt, stopping about 8-10 inches from where I started. I lay the 'tail' I left before, across where it will be sewed, and cut it off near the middle of the open space. I take the other 'tail' and lay it across the other, over lapping them. Very carefully, measure a 2.5 inch overlap, and cut only the second 'tail, at that measurement. Draw a diagonal line (45 degree) from one corner of one 'tail'. (I fold it to get it in the right spot.) Match the now square ends, right sides together, and pin. Lay it so you can see the drawn line, check for fit in the unsewn 'gap'. If it fits well, sew and trim, if not, fiddle with it until it does. Lay it down smooth and attach, using a 1/4 inch seam. Don't forget to miter the corners as you go around them *( there are several methods for mitering corners, just use the search on this board to learn how to do it). Because you used a bias strip, the binding will roll nice and flat to the back, and I then hand stitch it down, using a 'blind hem stitch', or a 'ladder stitch'. I DO NOT try to machine sew it down, as I know me too well and I will definitely screw that up. Feel free to try it on a small sample to see if it works for you. I hope this helps. I encourage you to find a tutorial for "french binding" so you can see it in action. I hope I have this clear enough to follow, clear as mud,

  2. #2
    Super Member carolaug's Avatar
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    I just found this tutorial on how to stitch a binding. For me this is very helpful most of the woman who have been stitching for years I am sure you will already know this. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQ3fqCI8cww

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    I do the same, except for the bias part. If you don't have curves, you really don't need to mess with bias strips. Some people will tell you that bias binding lasts longer than straight, but it's about as contentious as issue as prewash or not. It's strictly a matter of choice.

  4. #4
    Super Member QultingaddictUK's Avatar
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    I actually find this one: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=buCKs...eature=related the most helpful as it uses cross grain binging, I don't use bias binding other than for special projects that requires it. Each to their own :-D

  5. #5
    Power Poster sueisallaboutquilts's Avatar
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    Thank you!!!!!!!!! :D

  6. #6
    Super Member sewwhat85's Avatar
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    i do mine that way except the bias

  7. #7
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Thank you for the great tute :D:D:D

  8. #8
    tmg
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    Senior Member tmg's Avatar
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    I do that to but i cut my bias 2 3/8".

  9. #9
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gaigai
    I do the same, except for the bias part. If you don't have curves, you really don't need to mess with bias strips. Some people will tell you that bias binding lasts longer than straight, but it's about as contentious as issue as prewash or not. It's strictly a matter of choice.
    I, too, do basically the same except that I use fabric cut WOF and piece the ends diagonally.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by madamekelly
    You asked me to share how I do binding. Here it is, if you have more questions just ask. I cut bias strips 2.5 inches wide, and long enough to go around the quilt. I usually just cut a yard of fabric at a time. If I have extra, I save it for another project. I iron it in half lengthwise, using spray sizing. I start in the middle of a side, leaving a 1 foot 'tail' hanging loose, and sew it, with a 1/4 inch seam, all the way around the quilt, stopping about 8-10 inches from where I started. I lay the 'tail' I left before, across where it will be sewed, and cut it off near the middle of the open space. I take the other 'tail' and lay it across the other, over lapping them. Very carefully, measure a 2.5 inch overlap, and cut only the second 'tail, at that measurement. Draw a diagonal line (45 degree) from one corner of one 'tail'. (I fold it to get it in the right spot.) Match the now square ends, right sides together, and pin. Lay it so you can see the drawn line, check for fit in the unsewn 'gap'. If it fits well, sew and trim, if not, fiddle with it until it does. Lay it down smooth and attach, using a 1/4 inch seam. Don't forget to miter the corners as you go around them *( there are several methods for mitering corners, just use the search on this board to learn how to do it). Because you used a bias strip, the binding will roll nice and flat to the back, and I then hand stitch it down, using a 'blind hem stitch', or a 'ladder stitch'. I DO NOT try to machine sew it down, as I know me too well and I will definitely screw that up. Feel free to try it on a small sample to see if it works for you. I hope this helps. I encourage you to find a tutorial for "french binding" so you can see it in action. I hope I have this clear enough to follow, clear as mud,

    This is the way I do it also but I don't cut on the bias unless I have curved borders.

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