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Thread: 1916 Singer Motor/foot pedal question

  1. #1
    Senior Member Quercus Rubra's Avatar
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    1916 Singer Motor/foot pedal question

    Hello Y'all!! I have a question that I hope that someone here can help me with.

    I was given a "Redeye" 1916 Singer and for the most part I have no problems with "Charlie". The only thing is Charlie has a 1 amp motor (is that the right word?) and the foot pedal that is currently on it is a 1/2 amp. If I use Charlie for any real length of time the footpedal can get extremily HOT!!

    I don't know how to fix this and really don't want to give up on Charlie since this would my quilting machine. Any help would be very helpful but I'm hoping for a free or super cheap fix if there is such a critter since I don't have any funds to do a major or even a minor repair bill. I am also looking for any of manuals including one that would tell me about maintence that I would have to do on him.

    Could someone please help me. TIA
    Tricia
    http://tricia-ramblingsofaquilter.blogspot.com/
    Currently working on a "Flat Curtis" Quilt with boy child . He would like to TRADE some fabrics from each state FC travels to.

  2. #2
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Your machine will have a resistance type foot controller. All resistance type foot controllers will get warm, some get hot. The slower you go, the hotter they will get as the electrical current is dissipated as heat.

    You can install a modern resistance or electronic foot controller and that will take care of the problem.

    If you sew slow a lot then an electronic controller such as Sew-Classic sells will do the trick.

    I have one that I use and it works quite well. The only thing I don't like about it is it's made out of lightweight plastic and there's no substance to it. It has a tendency to scoot all over the place.


    Joe

  3. #3
    Super Member jlhmnj's Avatar
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    Hi Quercus,

    A foot pedal controller rated for .5 amp is pretty light duty. Safest thing is to get a new controller for $10 or $20. If your near a vintage sewing machine enthusiast they might be able to get you a used controller for cheap or free. Best of Luck.

    Jon
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 02-16-2013 at 01:54 PM. Reason: remove advertising

  4. #4
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    Your foot control should be at LEAST the same amperage as your motor...or more.

  5. #5
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Tricia ,
    Another thought on your controller. Take the cover or housing off of it and clean it good. Make sure the contacts are clean and the wire connections tight.
    Dirt, corrosion, burned contacts all will increase resistance and therefore heat.


    Pat,
    Just for curiosity sake I checked 3 controllers this morning. An electronic from Sew-Classic was rated at 1.2 amps, and two that came with Japanese machines were rated at 1 amp. The motor on the machine with the 1 amp controller does not list the amps, just the watts, 140.

    I have several with motors like this. Is there a conversion method to determine how many amps 140 watts is?


    Joe

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    Joe, I just did a search & found this http://www.ehow.com/how_4925656_convert-watts-amps.html

  7. #7
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Pat,

    Thanks for the formula link. I bookmarked it.

    Using the 140 Watts and 110 volts that motor comes out at 1.27 Amps.

    I'm thinking that most of the motor / controller combos will be similar to this. I'll be checking them for sure just to see.

    Joe

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