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Thread: 3D printing of sewing machine parts

  1. #1
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    3D printing of sewing machine parts

    I have been in a discussion with a few folks on Needlebar regarding the future of replacement parts for old machines using 3D printing.

    I did some searching on Shapeways(the site i use for 3D printing of stuff) and lo and behold...

    http://www.shapeways.com/model/10600...ductBox-search

    This is a top bevel gear for a singer 306... How is that for cool

    Printed in Stainless Steel it is $35.52 (currently)

    Lots of room for improvement, but what a start.

    I have been designing 3D parts on my PC for a while in anticipation of this process.

    I may print a couple Wheeler Wilson 8 parts to test them out.

  2. #2
    Junior Member MadCow333's Avatar
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    I confess to not quite understanding that technology. But I'd like to.

  3. #3
    Junior Member Windblown's Avatar
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    What a great application for this . A great idea.

    ~Karen
    Kenmore 158 19131, Elna Transforma, Singer 99-23, Red Eye Treadle 66-1, 301, Free Number 5

  4. #4
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    Is this like pressing parts out? I don't understand either. But that's not news.ha.

  5. #5
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    Printing in 3D involves a machine that lays down multiple layers of material, usually some form of plastic, that eventually builds up into whatever shape you wanted to print.

    Not sure how a solid stainless steel part would get printed.

  6. #6
    Super Member NikkiLu's Avatar
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    You and me both!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by MadCow333 View Post
    I confess to not quite understanding that technology. But I'd like to.
    Nikki in MO

  7. #7
    Super Member JudyTheSewer's Avatar
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    Very cool! This technology could keep a lot of great machines running long into the future.

  8. #8
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mlmack View Post
    Printing in 3D involves a machine that lays down multiple layers of material, usually some form of plastic, that eventually builds up into whatever shape you wanted to print.

    Not sure how a solid stainless steel part would get printed.
    Ditto that on not understanding how to use a 3D printer to make anything out of steel ... unless he means making a plastic prototype then taking the prototype to a CNC machine to mill out???

    Wanna clue us in Steve?
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  9. #9
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    Quick lesson in 3D printing....

    Imagine a cake decorator (bag of frosting with little tiny plastic/metal tip)

    Use the cake decorator moving back and forth to lay a layer of frosting in the table

    Let it cool a bit

    Add a new layer on top

    repeat this until you have a cube of frosting

    You just 3D printed a "cube"

    Now make it a machine not you
    Now make it plastic instead of frosting
    Now make the hole at the end of the "decorator" 1/10 of a millimeter across

    That is for plastic printing

    Metal is done the same way but it is ultra fine metal powder mixed with a bonding agent(epoxy)
    after making it they sinter (HIGH temp bake) it to remove the moisture and fuse it back into solid(ish) material

    Fine metals like Silver are done with the printer printing the "wax master" and then using traditional lost wax casting make the silver part.

  10. #10
    Super Member SteveH's Avatar
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    I use a free 3D drafting program called eMachineshop. I design the part, have the program save the design as a .STL 3d data image, upload it to Shapeways, they validate the design in 10 minutes or less, then you can order it. My parts have been coming in about 2 weeks.


    The really amazing use of this is in artificial knees and such. they can do a MRI of the knee, superimpose the 3dCAD drawing of the base replacement joint, adjust the design to fit the patient, and then have it produced using a more expensive method called "laser sintering" to produce a flawless Stainless steel part in 48 hours... AMAZING!!!

    Laser Sintering is where they take a "box" of tightly packed metal powder and aim three lasers at it. one from the top, one from the side, one from the end.

    ONLY where all three meet is it hot enough to melt the powder.

    they keep the lasers moving back and forth like the above printing until done.
    They literally lift the fused metal part out of the powder. (Think of it as greenware ceramics)
    then they fire it in a furnace to complete the fusing until it is solid, really solid.
    then a polish and ship...

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